Partnered for Health: How Health Interacts with Partnership and How Policy Manages Health Inequality

Partnered for Health: How Health Interacts with Partnership and How Policy Manages Health Inequality

Partnered for Health: How Health Interacts with Partnership and How Policy Manages Health Inequality

Partnered for Health: How Health Interacts with Partnership and How Policy Manages Health Inequalitys

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Référence bibliographique [9985]

Clouston, Sean. 2011. «Partnered for Health: How Health Interacts with Partnership and How Policy Manages Health Inequality». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de sociologie.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In this dissertation, I model the timing of changes in health before and after the transition into a cohabiting partnership to achieve the following objectives: Differentiate between the following hypotheses: partnership benefits, cleaning up for marriage, positive selection, and negative selection. Assess the presence and extent of gender differences in health returns to both marital and cohabiting partnerships Examine the impact of policy context on intersectional differences in health returns to partnership.» (p. xiv)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[D]oes the benefit to partnership depend on partnership type (marriage versus cohabitation)? And what is the timing of the benefit?» (p. 34)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The U.S. case will use data from the biennial Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) from 1984-2005 and the Canadian case will draw from the annual Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) between 1999 and 2005.» (p. xv)

Instruments :
Sondages

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


In this thesis, «[w]e focus on the transition into partnership as a highly selective event that is followed, in theory, by a period of health and social benefits. We use smoothed non-linear adjusted health curves surrounding the transition into partnership in order to determine who partners, along with when and how much benefits accrue. All analyses are separated by gender to understand the role that gender has in finding partners and benefiting from partnerships. Findings suggest first partnership benefits dominate in Canada, and positive selection dominates in the U.S., that differences in social benefits and healthcare policy determine the importance of health selection. We also show that partnership type plays a role that depends on policy regime and that gender modifies the role that benefits and selection play. This dissertation therefore highlights the unintended impact that social policies have in determining who partners and when. Put simply, ’marriage matters’ only when being ‘not married’ (i.e. single or cohabiting) is risky.» (p. iii)