Supporting Families in the ICU: A Descriptive Correlational Study of Informational Support, Anxiety, and Satisfaction with Care

Supporting Families in the ICU: A Descriptive Correlational Study of Informational Support, Anxiety, and Satisfaction with Care

Supporting Families in the ICU: A Descriptive Correlational Study of Informational Support, Anxiety, and Satisfaction with Care

Supporting Families in the ICU: A Descriptive Correlational Study of Informational Support, Anxiety, and Satisfaction with Cares

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Référence bibliographique [979]

Bailey, Joanna J., Sabbagh, Melanie, Loiselle, Carmen G., Boileau, Johanne et McVey, Lynne. 2010. «Supporting Families in the ICU: A Descriptive Correlational Study of Informational Support, Anxiety, and Satisfaction with Care ». Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, vol. 26, no 2, p. 114-122.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Supporting and even enhancing family members’ experience with the potentially life-threatening illness of a loved one requires a good grasp of many interrelated patient, family, health care provider and system factors. The present pilot study was conducted to provide a better understanding of some of these, namely family members’ (a) perceptions of informational support, (b) anxiety levels and (c) satisfaction with care, and the relationships among these, with the overarching objectives to further refine the informational support program and ensuing larger-scale evaluation. » (p. 115-116)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« The main hypothesis was that family members with more favorable impressions of the informational support offered would report significantly less anxiety and more satisfaction with care than those with less favorable impressions of the informational support offered. » (p. 116)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Vingt-neuf personnes ayant un membre de sa famille à l’unité des soins intensifs ont répondu à un questionnaire.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« It was hypothesized that family members with more favorable impressions of the informational support received from the ICU [intensive care unit] team would report less anxiety and greater satisfaction with care than those with less favorable impressions of informational support. Hypothesized relationships between informational support and anxiety, and satisfaction with care and anxiety were not supported by the results. […] The hypothesized relationship between informational support and satisfaction with care was supported by the significant positive correlation found between these variables. This result was as expected based on the number of previous studies that have shown the impact of specific information sharing interventions on family satisfaction (Azoulay et al., 2002; Chien et al., 2006; Medland and Ferrans, 1998). This finding supports the potential benefits of timely informational support interventions, such as the initiative being developed in this setting, as an avenue for improving satisfaction with other aspects of health care. » (p. 119-120)