Insecure Attachment States of Mind and Atypical Caregiving Behavior among Foster Mothers

Insecure Attachment States of Mind and Atypical Caregiving Behavior among Foster Mothers

Insecure Attachment States of Mind and Atypical Caregiving Behavior among Foster Mothers

Insecure Attachment States of Mind and Atypical Caregiving Behavior among Foster Motherss

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Référence bibliographique [977]

Ballen, Natasha, Bernier, Annie, Moss, Ellen, Tarabulsy, George M. et St-Laurent, Diane. 2010. «Insecure Attachment States of Mind and Atypical Caregiving Behavior among Foster Mothers ». Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, vol. 31, no 2, p. 118-125.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« [...] the main purpose of this report was to test the relation between caregiver attachment state of mind and atypical parenting behavior in a population at high risk for anomalous parenting and attachment: foster care dyads. In an attempt to shed further light on Dozier et al.’s (2001) findings pertaining to foster mothers with insecure states of mind, this study examined the link between caregiver unresolved state of mind and atypical caregiving, but also investigated links between insecure states of mind and atypical parenting. » (p. 119-120)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« It was expected that unresolved and insecure states of mind (dismissing, preoccupied and unresolved) in the foster mothers would relate to higher degrees of atypical parenting during child–caregiver interactions. » (p. 120)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Thirty-nine foster infant–caregiver dyads participated in this study. The foster caregivers were recruited through five Child Welfare agencies in the Montreal area. » (p. 120)

Instruments :
- Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; George et al., 1996)
- AMBIANCE coding system (Bronfman, Parsons, & Lyons-Ruth, 2006)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


First of all, « [t]he results revealed that caregivers with an insecure state of mind were more likely to exhibit atypical interactive behavior with their foster child than their secure counterparts. » (p. 123) Secondly, the results revealed that « [t]he aspects of caregivers’ discourse which were most relevant for understanding their disrupted parenting behavior were coherence, metacognition, and passivity. Coherence and metacognition were associated with lower levels of atypical behaviors, while passivity was associated with a greater likelihood of exhibiting atypical behaviors. » (p. 124) Thirdly, the authors « [...] did not find a relation between an unresolved state of mind and atypical maternal behavior » (p. 124) but « [...] found a clear association between insecure states of mind and fearful / disoriented behavior as well as intrusive / negative behavior. » (p. 124) Lastly, they found « [...] that the presence of abuse in the caregiver’s history and the overall score for unresolved state of mind were both significantly correlated with fearful / disoriented behavior. » (p. 124)