Coping behavior in children following the death of a parent

Coping behavior in children following the death of a parent

Coping behavior in children following the death of a parent

Coping behavior in children following the death of a parents

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Référence bibliographique [9681]

Brings, Barbara E. 1984. «Coping behavior in children following the death of a parent». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université de Montréal, Département de psychologie.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The purpose of this thesis is to present an understanding of how children adjust following the death of a parent » (p. 4)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau
« 32 school children between 8 and 18 years-old whose parent(s) died 1 to 12 years earlier. [...] Fourteen of the children lost their mothers (10 girls, 4 boys) and fourteen their fathers (9 girls , 5 boys) The remaining four children were bereaved of both their parents, in three cases successively and one case simultaneously. » (p. 43)

Instrument :
Guide d’entretien non-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Several theories exist to explain the child response following a death in the family. Studies with children have shown that youngsters grieve in a significant way for the loss of a parent and that several factors may influence their nourning. Influences include: the cause of death, the situation prior to the death and stresses occuring since. The present study involves 32 school children between 8 and 18 years-old whose parent(s) died 1 to 12 years earlier. Their perceptions of surrounding stress and loss-related feelings were assessed. Results corroborate earlier findings that children show many and varied responses to loss. The study also indicates that the loss related feelings persist for many years. This is consistent with current theory that mourning is continuous. The intensity of loss-related feelings is correlated with the intensity of stress and with the presence of clinical symptoms. The stress increase significantly as time progresses following bereavement. Findings imply that the effects of loss become noticeable only as time lapses and that an important determining factor may be the child’s and surviving adult’s perception of their loss experience. The influence of perceptions and attitudes in general on the child’s adjustment are discussed. » (sommaire)