Using the Life Course Perspective to Study the Entry into the Illness Trajectory: The Perspective of Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Disease

Using the Life Course Perspective to Study the Entry into the Illness Trajectory: The Perspective of Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Disease

Using the Life Course Perspective to Study the Entry into the Illness Trajectory: The Perspective of Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Disease

Using the Life Course Perspective to Study the Entry into the Illness Trajectory: The Perspective of Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Diseases

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Référence bibliographique [869]

Carpentier, Normand, Bernard, Paul, Grenier, Amanda et Guberman, Nancy. 2010. «Using the Life Course Perspective to Study the Entry into the Illness Trajectory: The Perspective of Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Disease ». Social Science and Medecine, vol. 70, no 10, p. 1501-1508.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of this study was to track social interactions of caregivers and their entourage in order to understand and map/identify typologies of entry into the Alzheimer’s caregiving trajectory.» (p. 1502)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«What are the various ways (or pathways) that one comes to enter the Alzheimer’s caregiving trajectory? How might the principles of the LCP [life course perspective] inform our understandings of entry into the care trajectory?» (p. 1502)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We recruited 60 caregivers in two clinics specialized in the evaluation of the cognitive difficulties of elderly people in Montreal, Canada. […] The majority were born in Quebec (80%) and just over half were retired (52.5%). The ill relatives averaged 77.9 years old and most were retired (80%): 27 were their caregiver’s husband and 19 were their caregiver’s mother.» (p. 1502)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Our study reveals the importance of to the entry into the trajectory of four dimensions of the LCP: family history, linked lives, human agency and organisational effects, and the ways in which these dimensions point to differing types of entry into the illness trajectory. We expect that our identification of five types of entry into the trajectory, and our future analysis of the entire course of the trajectory, will generate important information for the creation of interventions that will better meet the diverse needs of elderly people with chronic disease and their families. […] [I]t is essential that we understand the initial trajectory period during which families experience great stress but must nonetheless negotiate with both the members of formal systems and the members of informal systems of care. Families’ initial contacts with healthcare professionals and other members of systems of care are of great significance because the alliances forged are likely to last for several years. If healthcare services are to maximize their effectiveness, they must adapt to new realities in new ways. They can do this by investing more time with older people more likely to experience different health problems, by paying close attention to interpersonal relations - by showing respect, for example, and by being attentive and empathetic to the individual needs of each family […].» (p. 1508)