Low Fertility and Contraceptive Sterilization: The Canadian Case

Low Fertility and Contraceptive Sterilization: The Canadian Case

Low Fertility and Contraceptive Sterilization: The Canadian Case

Low Fertility and Contraceptive Sterilization: The Canadian Cases

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [862]

Charton, Laurence et Lapierre-Adamcyk, Évelyne. 2010. «Low Fertility and Contraceptive Sterilization: The Canadian Case ». Canadian Studies in Population, vol. 37, no 3-4, p. 375-410.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article presents fertility variations among the Canadian regions and analyses the paths leading to the choice of contraceptive sterilization.» (p. 375)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«In this paper, the underlying hypothesis is that the use of contraceptive sterilization may become a strategy for achieving [the couples’ plans].» (p. 377)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
This study is based on «[…] the 2001 Canadian General Social Survey undertaken by Statistics Canada. The sample includes 2490 women belonging to the cohort [aged between 40-49 in 2001], and allows for an analysis of Canada as a whole and five regions: Atlantic, Québec, Ontario, Prairies and British Columbia.» (p. 379)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The authors think that «[…] the research shows that while every region has adopted a low fertility regime, substantial differences are observed among women aged 40-49 in 2001: Quebec couples had fewer children; among those in stable unions, Quebec couples were also more likely to choose contraceptive sterilization, while this was not the case among those couples where at least one of the spouses was in a second union; moreover, couples in such unions were less likely to have a common child in Quebec than in other regions. In the end, if regional differences in the choice of sterilization persist, they are not large, and this choice is driven by fertility decisions everywhere.» (p. 375)