Can Spouse Support be Accurately and Reliably Rated? A Generalizability Study of Families with Disruptive Boys

Can Spouse Support be Accurately and Reliably Rated? A Generalizability Study of Families with Disruptive Boys

Can Spouse Support be Accurately and Reliably Rated? A Generalizability Study of Families with Disruptive Boys

Can Spouse Support be Accurately and Reliably Rated? A Generalizability Study of Families with Disruptive Boyss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [8353]

Lavigueur, Suzanne, Tremblay, Richard E. et Saucier, Jean-François. 1993. «Can Spouse Support be Accurately and Reliably Rated? A Generalizability Study of Families with Disruptive Boys ». Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, vol. 34, no 5, p. 689-714.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The aim of the study was to isolate components of score variance found in the spouse support scores for facets of spouses (p), raters (j), situation (i) and their interactions (p x i ; p x j ; i x j ; p x i x j). » (p. 698)
Questions/Hypothèses :
« The investigation aimed at answering two questions:
(1) Can spouse support be accurately and reliably rated by trained observers?
(2) If so, what are the relative ’setting’ and ’subject’ components of observed spouse support?
More precisely, in families with a disruptive boy, should spouse support be considered as a relatively stable trait-like characteristic of fathers or does it vary as a function of the contextual particularities in which the interactions occur? » (pp. 695-696)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
« Forty-four families from a longitudinal study of disruptive boys (Tremblay, 1992) were studied. » (p. 698)

Instruments :
Grille d’observation
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu et analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The present study addressed two questions: Can support be accurately and reliably rated? What are the relative setting and subject effects on observed spouse support? From a sample of families with a disruptive boy, the supportive or stressing behaviors of the father towards the mother were rated by trained observers in four different standardized situations. A generalizability study was carried out to assess the relative contribution of variance due to subjects, situations, and raters on the support and stress scores. Results indicate a reliable inter-rater assessment of observed spouse support. Spouse support appears to be controlled both by personal and by situational characteristics. » (p. 689)