Parental and Sibling Influences on the Timing of Marriage, XVIIth and XVIIIth Century Québec

Parental and Sibling Influences on the Timing of Marriage, XVIIth and XVIIIth Century Québec

Parental and Sibling Influences on the Timing of Marriage, XVIIth and XVIIIth Century Québec

Parental and Sibling Influences on the Timing of Marriage, XVIIth and XVIIIth Century Québecs

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Référence bibliographique [805]

Dillon, Lisa. 2010. «Parental and Sibling Influences on the Timing of Marriage, XVIIth and XVIIIth Century Québec ». Annales de démographie historique, vol. 119, no 1, p. 139-180.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article targets marriage as well as celibacy as critical demographic phenomena which illuminate the evolution of social reproduction and the balance of intergenerational power.» (p. 139)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This paper employs the Registre de la population du Québec ancien (RPQA), a family reconstitution database which encompasses the French Catholic population living in the French colonial settlements which bordered the St. Lawrence River. […] To observe marriage behaviour directly, I use dated events in the RPQA to establish statistics such as mean age at marriage, mean age at the death of parents, birth rank and the association of family characteristics with Québec women and men’s propensity to marry.» (p. 148)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The author has addressed «[…] family influences on the timing of marriage in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Québec, exploring how intersecting parental and sibling characteristics and events affected the hazard of marriage for persons born in Québec before 1739. The paternal authority hypothesis is generally confirmed by both simple statistics and an event-history analysis which shows the favourable chances of firstborn daughters and sons to marry, both in terms of their higher intensity of marriage and their generally younger ages at marriage. Younger children were less likely to marry if their elder siblings were not yet married. A “passed over” effect is also observed: both women and men had an especially lower risk of marriage if they had younger siblings who were already married. Notable proportions of Québec women married out of birth order. This research suggests a more nuanced understanding of the balance between paternal authority and individual choice. Parents played critical roles in children’s residential and marriage decisions, yet evidence also suggests some bargaining power on the part of children who benefited from favourable demographic or economic circumstances.» (p. 180)