Supporting Fathers and Supported Mothers in Families with Disruptive Boys: Who Are They?

Supporting Fathers and Supported Mothers in Families with Disruptive Boys: Who Are They?

Supporting Fathers and Supported Mothers in Families with Disruptive Boys: Who Are They?

Supporting Fathers and Supported Mothers in Families with Disruptive Boys: Who Are They?s

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Référence bibliographique [7922]

Lavigueur, Suzanne, Saucier, Jean-François et Tremblay, Richard E. 1995. «Supporting Fathers and Supported Mothers in Families with Disruptive Boys: Who Are They? ». Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, vol. 36, no 6, p. 1003-1018.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Considering the key role played by fathers in mothers’ coping with ’difficult’ children, the goal of the present study was to observe spouse support in this special family context, to explore the characteristics of fathers who gave support and of mothers who were likely to receive it. » (p. 1006)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
« Forty-four families from a longitudinal study of kindergarten boys in schools of low socioeconomic areas of Montreal (Tremblay, 1992) were studied. » (p. 1007)

Instruments :
- the Spouse Support Rating Scale (SSRS, Lavigueur et al. 1993);
- the Social Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ);
- the index for occupations in Canada (Blishen & McRoberts, 1976);
- the French Canadian version of the WAIS-R (Barbeau & Pinard, 1963);
- the Johns Hopkins Clinic’s Emotional Symptoms Checklist (Derogatis, 1977);
- the short version of the Marital Adjustment test (Locke & Wallace, 1959).
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« What are the personal characteristics of supported mothers and supporting fathers, in the context of families having disruptive boys? The supportive and unsupportive behaviors of fathers towards mothers (N = 44) were rated by observers in standardized situations. Characteristics of both fathers and mothers were used to predict support: age, education, IQ, reported parental care during childhood, symptoms of distress and marital satisfaction. The joint characteristics of both spouses were better predictors than fathers’ or mothers’ characteristics alone. Unexpectedly more support and less stress correlated with more unfavorable characteristics of the father compared to the mother for the same marital dyad. Both spouses’ reports on parental care were highly predictive of fathers’ supportive and unsupportive behaviors towards mothers, whereas higher intellectual abilities of fathers predicted unsupportive behaviors. Results are discussed in relation to marital relations and differences between behavioral versus reported assessments of spouse support. » (p. 1003)