Rough-and-Tumble Play and the Development of Physical Aggression and Emotion Regulation: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study

Rough-and-Tumble Play and the Development of Physical Aggression and Emotion Regulation: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study

Rough-and-Tumble Play and the Development of Physical Aggression and Emotion Regulation: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study

Rough-and-Tumble Play and the Development of Physical Aggression and Emotion Regulation: A Five-Year Follow-Up Studys

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Référence bibliographique [779]

Flanders, Joseph L., Simard, Melissa, Paquette, Daniel, Parent, Sophie, Vitaro, Frank, Pihl, Robert O. et Séguin, Jean R. 2010. «Rough-and-Tumble Play and the Development of Physical Aggression and Emotion Regulation: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study ». Journal of Family Violence, vol. 25, no 4, p. 357-367.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The current study the hypothesis that the frequency of father-child RTP [rough-and-tumble play] and the father’s dominance during play in the preschool years would still be related to children’s physically aggressive behavior and emotion regulation abilities 5 years later. » (p. 363)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« In 2001 (Time 1), a community sample of 85 father-child dyads (43 boys and 42 girls) were observed during a freeplay activity (Flanders et al. 2009); a follow-up study was conducted in 2006 (Time 2). » (p. 360)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Rough-and-tumble play is a dynamic, enjoyable and common activity in children and widely observed in non-human animals. Several authors have proposed that father-child RTP is related to the development of self-regulation in children (Paquette 2004; Peterson and Flanders 2005), although little empirical work has been done to test this theory directly. The current study was a 5-year follow-up to an initial study demonstrating that RTP frequency was associated concurrently with physically aggressive behavior in the preschool years among children whose fathers were less dominant during play (Flanders et al. 2009). The follow-up showed the same relationship with physical aggression measured 5 years later. The model also predicted worse emotion regulation abilities 5 years later, independently from the effect on physical aggression. These findings suggest that RTP can indeed be associated with behavior problems, but only when fathers are unable to maintain an authoritative position in the play interactions. Most researchers and parents will acknowledge that play is an important part of the father-child relationship. Thus, it is important to develop a greater understanding of the potential gain and harm these activities may bring to a child’s development. » (p. 365)