Family Organization, Retirement and Sectoral Employment in Developing Agricultural Economies

Family Organization, Retirement and Sectoral Employment in Developing Agricultural Economies

Family Organization, Retirement and Sectoral Employment in Developing Agricultural Economies

Family Organization, Retirement and Sectoral Employment in Developing Agricultural Economiess

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Référence bibliographique [7485]

St-Amour, Pascal et Vencatachellum, Désiré. 1996. Family Organization, Retirement and Sectoral Employment in Developing Agricultural Economies. Coll. «coll. Cahier de recherche n° IEA-96-04». Montréal: Université de Montréal, École des Hautes Études Commerciales, Institut d’économie appliquée.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper studies the impact of family organizations (extended and nuclear) and elders’ retirement on occupational employment in developing low income economies. » (p. 3)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« For this purpose, we consider a dynamic framework where a landlord hires landless agents whom he either trains to be sharecroppers in the next period, or who work as laborers. We postulate an overlapping generation structure, where each agent lives two periods. Both trainees and laborers are paid the same fixed efficiency wage. » (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement de données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This paper studies the impact of family structures and elders’ participation status on sectoral labor allocation in developing agricultural economies. In an overlapping generations framework with adult and old agents, we model a landlord’s decision to hire adult apprentices and elder unskilled labor to farm under his supervision and/or to award sharecropping contracts to skilled (i.e. trained) elders only. Each landless individual can pool resources within an extended family, such that the old agent guarantees subsistence consumption to his unemployed dependent but takes a share of the adult’s wage if the latter is employed. We derive sectoral employment implications for both the extended and the nuclear family organizations of exogenous changes in technology, population, land and intra-family distribution, for the cases where i° the elders are allowed to participate in the market for unskilled labor, and ii° elders are retired from that market. We find that the family structure influences the complementarity and substitutability of skilled and unskilled employment. In particular, while the nuclear family implies thet skilled and unskilled labor are usually treated as substitutes, the extended family yields sufficient conditions for skilled and unskilled labor increases or reductions, following exogenous changes in the model’s technological and distributional parameters. »