Adaptation of Services to New Immigrant Families: Perceptions families and Practitioners

Adaptation of Services to New Immigrant Families: Perceptions families and Practitioners

Adaptation of Services to New Immigrant Families: Perceptions families and Practitioners

Adaptation of Services to New Immigrant Families: Perceptions families and Practitionerss

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Référence bibliographique [7287]

Legault, Gisèle, Gravel, Sylvie, Fortin, Sylvie et Heneman, Bernard. 1997. «Adaptation of Services to New Immigrant Families: Perceptions families and Practitioners ». Revue canadienne de santé mentale communautaire / Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, vol. 16, no 1, p. 67-85.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The objectives of the study were to identified adaptation problems through a study of the principal health/social/cultural problems encountered, to examine how families resolve these problems through use of the formal and informal network of services, to identify factors limiting access to these services, and to document the sociodemographic profile of new immigrants families (i.e. families with young children having immigrated within the five years perceding the study). » (p. 68)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« 297 mothers/families were interviewed and 40 practitioners were selected using a stratified mode of selection (3 CLSC x 2 sectors in each CLSC) They were drawn in equal proportions from the medical and social sectors of the two networks. » (p. 69)

Instruments :
« Interviews with families were carried out in their homes and lasted an hour and a half; initerviews with practitioners were conducted in the workplace and lasted an hour. The research instrument was a questionnaire composed mainly of closed questions, with a few open-ended questions designed to obtain specific data on certain topics. » (p. 69)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This article is based on the results of an exploratory/descriptive study conducted among 297 young immigrant families and 40 practitioners. It examine the health, social, and cultural problems encountered by the families and the ways they resolve these problems. In health sector, there are marked differences between the priorities of families and practitioners. Families give priority to their children’s health problems whereas practitioners prioritize the mothers’ problems, particularly regarding mental health. In the social sector, perceptual differences among families and practitioners as to priority difficulties are attenuated, converging toward problems related to low employment and financial difficulties. In the cultural sector, problems related to isolation rank first among families, followed by problems concerning day care and the host country’s educational practices. Practitioners, on the other hand, see couple relationships as the main concern. Families prefer to seek help from the formal services network when faced with difficulties relating to health or to settlement in the host country, in accordance with practitioners’ expectations. However, they turn first to the informal network when it comes to sociocultural adaptation problems. Difficulties related to accessibility and compatibility of services are seen as more serious by practitioners than by families. » (p. 67)