Access by Noncustodial Parents: Effects Upon Children’s Postdivorce Coping Resources

Access by Noncustodial Parents: Effects Upon Children’s Postdivorce Coping Resources

Access by Noncustodial Parents: Effects Upon Children’s Postdivorce Coping Resources

Access by Noncustodial Parents: Effects Upon Children’s Postdivorce Coping Resourcess

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Référence bibliographique [7256]

Pagani-Kurtz, Linda S. et Derevensky, Jeffrey L. 1997. «Access by Noncustodial Parents: Effects Upon Children’s Postdivorce Coping Resources ». Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, vol. 27, no 1/2, p. 43-55.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« [...] the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the frequency and duration of visitation with noncustodial parents and children’s self-esteem and self-efficacy during post-divorce period. The effects of such visitation practices upon interparental conflict was examined as well. » (p. 46)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« It was hypothesized that children’s self-referent thought would vary as a function of their involvement with noncustodial parent and that the contact between ex-spouses associated with visitation would have an effect upon overtly expressed marital hostility. » (p. 46)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Thrity-five children (18 boys and 17 girls ), equally distributed in grades one through six, and their custodial parents participated in this investigation. Children were selected from a voluntary middle-class sample using a stratified technique in Montreal. Their natural parents had been legally divorced ranging from 1 month to 10.4 years. » (p. 47)

Instruments :
- Family Background Survey [FBS] (Krutz + Derevensky, 1993);
- Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children [HSPP] (Harter, 1985);
- Overt Marital Hostility Scale [OPS] (Porter +O »Leary, 1980).

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This investigation examined the influence of visitation by noncustodial parents (i.e., frequency and durantion of contacts) upon children’s self-esteem and self-efficacy. The relationship between noncustodial visitation practices and interparental conflict witnessed by children was explored as well. 35 elementary school children and their divorced parents participated in this investigation. All families were experiencing sole residential child-care arrangements with variations in the frequency and duration of noncustodial visitation. Measures included the Family Background Survey and the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Children. Regression analyses revealed a significant positive relationship between duration of visits and children self-esteem. The frequency of visitation with the level of interparental hostility. » (p. 43)