Ethical Dimensions of Intervention with Violent Partners: Priorities in the Values and Beliefs of Practitioners

Ethical Dimensions of Intervention with Violent Partners: Priorities in the Values and Beliefs of Practitioners

Ethical Dimensions of Intervention with Violent Partners: Priorities in the Values and Beliefs of Practitioners

Ethical Dimensions of Intervention with Violent Partners: Priorities in the Values and Beliefs of Practitionerss

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Référence bibliographique [7223]

Rondeau, Gilles, Lindsay, Jocelyn, Beaudoin, Ginette et Brodeur, Normand. 1997. «Ethical Dimensions of Intervention with Violent Partners: Priorities in the Values and Beliefs of Practitioners». Dans Out of Darkness: Contemporary Perspectives on Family Violence , sous la dir. de Glenda Kaufman Kantor et Jasinski, Jana, p. 282-295. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This chapter present mainly the results of one of aspect of the research project on the ethical dimensions involved in direct practice with violent partners, «[...] that to identifying the principal values of practitioners with regard to their ethical preoccupation.» (p. 282-283)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon de cette recherche se compose de 45 praticiens qui travaillent auprès de partenaires violents.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This chapter is about an exploratory research project conducted in collaboration with the Quebec Association of Resources Working With Violent Partners (ARIHV) on the ethical dimensions involved in direct practice with violent partners.» (p. 282) It puts «[...] forward the values and beliefs of practitioners with regard to professional practice with violent partners. The data presented should be considered in conjunction with other quantitative data on the characteristics of practitioners and organizations and on the dilemmas and the difficulties faced by practitioners as well as resolution of ethical dilemmas. [...] Finally, giving these data as feedback to the practitioners shall provide in return better information regarding the possible options available to those who try to resolve complex ethical questions in the field of violence.» (p. 293-294)