Are Mom and Dad Married? And Does It Matter for the Future of the Family?

Are Mom and Dad Married? And Does It Matter for the Future of the Family?

Are Mom and Dad Married? And Does It Matter for the Future of the Family?

Are Mom and Dad Married? And Does It Matter for the Future of the Family?s

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Référence bibliographique [7001]

Le Bourdais, Céline et Neill, Ghyslaine. 1998. «Are Mom and Dad Married? And Does It Matter for the Future of the Family?». Dans Contributions to Family Demography. Essays in Honour of Dr. Wayne W. McVey Jr. , p. 75-97. Edmonton, Alberta: University of Alberta, Department of Sociology, Population Research Laboratory.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« We will specifically examine the factors that are affecting the risk of disruption faced by families from the moment a child is born to the couple. » (p. 76)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« What do those changes mean for family life? In other words, are the changing patterns of family formation and mothers’ increasing participation in the labor market having any impact on the stability of families? » (p. 76)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The data used in this analysis come from the General social Survey on family (cycle 100 carried out by Statistics Canada during 1995. The GSS is stratified sample of 10 749 men and women aged 15 years old and over in 1995 livig in Canada, with an oversampling of residents from the province of Quebec; of these 5914 were women. » (p. 80)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement de données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« We have examined the effects that the circumstances surrounding family formation and the attachment of women to the labor market exert on the likelihood of disruption among families whose first child was born between 1970 and the mind 1990’s. In line with previous research, we found that women’s age at the beginning of the union, pre-union conceptions, and the period and conjugal setting in which the child was born all affect the odds of conjugal separation. However, our analysis has shown that these factors operate differently across Canada, and has confirmed our intuition that cohabitation and marriage are now taking different meanings between regions. Hence, our results suggest that the gap separating cohabiting women or women who married their common-law partner from those who married directly is narrowing in Quebec, as these types of behaviors are becoming more widespread, while it is not elsewhere in Canada. » (p. 92)