Correlates of Attachment at School Age: Maternal Reported Stress, Mother-Child Interaction, and Behavior Problems

Correlates of Attachment at School Age: Maternal Reported Stress, Mother-Child Interaction, and Behavior Problems

Correlates of Attachment at School Age: Maternal Reported Stress, Mother-Child Interaction, and Behavior Problems

Correlates of Attachment at School Age: Maternal Reported Stress, Mother-Child Interaction, and Behavior Problemss

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Référence bibliographique [6968]

Moss, Ellen, Rousseau, Denise, Parent, Sophie, St-Laurent, Diane et Saintonge, Julie. 1998. «Correlates of Attachment at School Age: Maternal Reported Stress, Mother-Child Interaction, and Behavior Problems ». Child Development, vol. 69, no 5, p. 1390-1405.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In this article, we report concurrent ans predictive associations between attachment at age 5-7, maternal psychosocial measures, mother-child interactive patterns, and teacher-reported behavior problems. » (p. 1390)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« We expected that mothers of the ambivalent group would report the highest felt stress and depression, with mothers of avoidant and controlling children showing a positive bias in self-reports. Concerning interactions, we expected that secure 5- to 7-year-olds would have more open, reciprocal communication patterns with mothers than would insecure, with controlling dyads showing the least reciprocity and the most role reversal. Ambivalent dyads were expected to show exaggerated interpersonal focus and avoidant dyads less open communication patterns when compared with secures. Concerning the contribution of insecure attachment, mother-child interactive patterns, and maternal self-reports to the prediction of school-age behavior problems, we expected that controlling children would be at increased risk, but we had more open hypotheses concerning the predictive role of other insecure classifications and family processes variables, as well as the type (internalizing or externalizing) of problems manifested. » (p. 1392)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Study participants were French-speaking children [...]. [...] The sample is quite heterogeneous with respect to income level, with 25% of families earning under $20,000, 33% earning between $20,000 and $40,000, and 42% at $40,000 and above. Average maternal education is 13,8 years, with 32% of mothers experiencing 12 years or less of schooling and the rest having some college or university level training. 72% of sample children were firstborn, 24% second-born, and 4% third of later. 36% of sample children were living in a mother-headed, single-parent family, whereas the rest were living with both parents. » (p. 1392)

Instruments :
- Separation-Reunion Procedure;
- Attachment classification based on the Cassidy and Marvin (1992) and the Main and Cassidy systems (1988);
- Parental Stress Inventory (PSI; Abidin, 1992);
- Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mosh + Erbaugh, 1961);
- Mother-child Interaction coding;
- Preschool Socio-Affective Profil (PSP; LaFrenière, Dumas, Capuano + Dubeau, 1992);
- Social Behavior questionnaire (SBQ; Tremblay, Vitaro, Gagnon, Piche + Royer, 1992).

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The contribution of attachment, maternal reported stress, and motherchild interaction to the prediction of teacher-reported behavior problems was examined for a FrenchCanadian sample of 121 schoolage children. Attachment classifications were assigned o the basis of reunion behavior with mother when the children were between 5 and 7 years of age. Maternal reported stress and motherchild interaction patterns were assessed concurrent to the attachment measure, whereas behavior problems were evaluated both at ages 5 to 7 and 7 to 9 years. Security of attachment significantly predicted the likelihood of schoolage behavior problems: Controllingother children were most at risk for both externalizing and internalizing problems across both age periods. Younger ambivalent children presented clinical cutoff levels of externalizing problems, and older avoidant boys had higher internalizing scores. Patterns of maternal-reported stress and motherchild interaction differed across attachment groups and contributed to prediction of schoolage behavior problems, partially mediating the relation between attachment and adaptation. Results support the importance of attachment in explaining schoolage adaptation and avidity of attachment coding for children of this age. » (p. 1390)