Daughters-in-Law as Caregivers: How and Why Do They Come to Care?

Daughters-in-Law as Caregivers: How and Why Do They Come to Care?

Daughters-in-Law as Caregivers: How and Why Do They Come to Care?

Daughters-in-Law as Caregivers: How and Why Do They Come to Care?s

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [6715]

Guberman, Nancy. 1999. «Daughters-in-Law as Caregivers: How and Why Do They Come to Care? ». Journal of Women & Aging, vol. 11, no 1, p. 82-102.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper expands on these earlier studies and looks at the interaction between family dynamics and socio-structural factors in explaining how and why some women become delegated or joint caregivers in affinal relations. As well, it addresses the questions of the division of labor between these women and their husbands, and looks at the prevailing attitudes about care by in-laws among the broader caregiver population. » (p. 87)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
10 entrevues d’une heure à deux heures et demie (dans la langue de leur choix, français anglais, italien, créole) de neuf belles-filles et d’une belle-sœur, aidantes naturelles.

Instruments :
Guide d’entrevue

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« This exploratory qualitative study examines the family dynamics and socio-structural factors which explain how and why some women become caregivers to in-laws. As well, it explores prevailing attitudes about care by in-laws. Material is drawn retrospectively from three previous studies of caregivers in Montreal, Quebec, including 10 semi-structured interviews with daughters-in-law and 72 interviews with spousal and child caregivers. An exploratory framework of the factors which are determinant in becoming a daughter-in-law caregiver is proposed which includes such elements as: social and cultural norms regarding family responsibility for eldercare; social and cultural norms regarding the place and the rights of the elderly; rules of family relations, couple dynamics, gender dynamics and family availability. » (p. 85)