Needs, Barriers and Facilitators Experienced by Spouses of People With Aphasia

Needs, Barriers and Facilitators Experienced by Spouses of People With Aphasia

Needs, Barriers and Facilitators Experienced by Spouses of People With Aphasia

Needs, Barriers and Facilitators Experienced by Spouses of People With Aphasias

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Référence bibliographique [644]

Le Dorze, Guylaine et Signori, France-Hélène. 2010. «Needs, Barriers and Facilitators Experienced by Spouses of People With Aphasia ». Disability and Rehabilitation, vol. 32, no 13, p. 1073-1087.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This research aimed to better understand the process that spouses of people with aphasia engage in, over time, to satisfy their needs. [...] More specifically, the aims were to: (1) describe the needs of spouses caring for an aphasic person, (2) determine whether the needs were fulfilled or not and (3) identify the facilitators and barriers associated with the needs.» (p. 1073)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon se compose de onze épouses d’hommes aphasiques faisant partie d’associations pour les personnes atteintes d’aphasie.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Little is known about how spouses cope with their needs as a result of their partner’s aphasia. This study described spouses’ needs and identified the barriers and facilitators to satisfying them.» The results of this research show that «[s]pouses mainly needed support and respite, and perceived their partner to need help for communication and wellbeing. Personal factors like the availability of close others to provide help were facilitating. However, participants encountered barriers, mainly organisational, i.e. the help needed did not exist. Some needs persisted over time. [...] Results confirm the long-term needs of spouses in adjusting to the aphasia of their partner, as well as the limited services available to them. Many of the needs reflected spouses’ concerns about their partner, while others were a consequence of their caregiving role as well as the unavailability of support. Spouses of people with aphasia should have access to support during and after rehabilitation.» (p. 1073)