Gender at Work at Home: Family Decisions, The Labour Market, And Girls’ Contributions to The Family Economy

Gender at Work at Home: Family Decisions, The Labour Market, And Girls’ Contributions to The Family Economy

Gender at Work at Home: Family Decisions, The Labour Market, And Girls’ Contributions to The Family Economy

Gender at Work at Home: Family Decisions, The Labour Market, And Girls’ Contributions to The Family Economys

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Référence bibliographique [6377]

Bradbury, Bettina. 2000. «Gender at Work at Home: Family Decisions, The Labour Market, And Girls’ Contributions to The Family Economy». Dans Canadian Family History: Selected Readings , sous la dir. de Bettina Bradbury, p. 177-198. Toronto: Irwin Pub.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In this paper I would like to argue that while wokplace centred approached go a long way toward explaining sex segregation within specific trades, they ignore different levels of decision making and other institutions that have already gendered the workforce before it arrives at the factory gate. » (p. 177)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« How does gender work as a process in society wich means that men and women end up with different work life experiences? » (p. 177)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« The paper concentrated on the micro-level, examining what I have been able to deduce about family decision-making processes regrading wich family members should seek wage labour in two Montreal working-class wards between the 1860s and 1890s. A brief description of the major sectors employing males in Montreal is followed by an assessment of the importance of additional wage earners to working-class families. The respective work of sons and daugthers within the family economy is evaluated.
The sexual division of labour within the family, and the need for additional domestic workers as well as extra wage labourers, I argue, meant that labour were different. By looking at the role of girls in the family economy and not just in the labour market, we can better see how the major changes accompanying the emergence of industrial capitalism in Montreal did not modify the dominant sexual division of labour. » (p. 178)