Premarital Childbearing in Urban Cameroon: Paternal Recognition, Child Care and Financial Support

Premarital Childbearing in Urban Cameroon: Paternal Recognition, Child Care and Financial Support

Premarital Childbearing in Urban Cameroon: Paternal Recognition, Child Care and Financial Support

Premarital Childbearing in Urban Cameroon: Paternal Recognition, Child Care and Financial Supports

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Référence bibliographique [6369]

Calvès, Anne Emmanuèle. 2000. «Premarital Childbearing in Urban Cameroon: Paternal Recognition, Child Care and Financial Support ». Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 31, no 4, p. 443-461.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« [T]he purpose of the present paper is to answer these questions using Yaoundé, the capital city of Cameroon, as a research setting. More specifically, the study explores the determinants of paternal recognition and examines the sources of care and support received by children living with unmarried mothers and how they vary depending on whether a child has a recognized father or not. » (p. 444)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
384 hommes et femmes de 20 à 29 ans, ainsi que 264 enfants.

Instruments :
Questionnaire de sondage

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« In many African countries, including Cameroon, an increasing number of urban young women and men postpone their entry into first marriage because of financial constraints and educational opportunities [...]. Although they delay marriage, unmarried African youth do not wait for marriage to become sexually active and a growing number of children are born within informal sexual unions [...]. In fact, more than the actual timing of birth and marriage, lack of paternal recognition and paternal support often defines premarital childbearing as a social and economic problem. As Bledsoe and Cohen pointed out (1993), for most African children, ’whether the parents have actually concluded a marriage is considerably less important than whether a man is willing to acknowledge fatherhood and to claim the social and economic responsabilities of that role’. » (p. 443)