Family Caregiving and Consequences for Carers: Toward a Policy Research Agenda

Family Caregiving and Consequences for Carers: Toward a Policy Research Agenda

Family Caregiving and Consequences for Carers: Toward a Policy Research Agenda

Family Caregiving and Consequences for Carers: Toward a Policy Research Agendas

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Référence bibliographique [6272]

Fast, Janet E. et Keating, Norah C. 2000. Family Caregiving and Consequences for Carers: Toward a Policy Research Agenda. Ottawa: Canadian Policy Research Networks.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of this paper is to outline a research agenda that will lead to a better understanding of, and more informed decision making about, policies that affect those who care for adult family members in need.» (p. 1)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«The collective effect of demographic, social, economic and policy trends has made family caregiving a policy issue of outmost importance in Canada. The nature of these trends is relatively well-understood. Families are smaller, more diverse, more complex, and less stable. Further, the gendered division of labour within families is being supplanted by ’double duty’ lives, typified by simultaneous participation in paid and unpaid work for both men and women. At the same time, population aging, new patterns of chronic illness and disability, and increased survival after catastrophic illness and injury, are changing the landscape of care needs. Health and continuing care policy reform is shifting responsability for care from formal to informal carers. Changes in the income security system are reducing the ability of care receivers and care providers to absorb the financial burden that often accompanies the need for care. Conversely, policies and programs intended to defray these costs are evolving. Public and private workplace policies that may mitigate the impact of care responsabilities on carers’ employment also are evolving. Somewhat less is known about the effects these trends will have on family caregivers. Social trends appear destined to stretch the capacity of family members to care for those in need. Population health trends likely mean greater demand for care, higher expectations about the level of care, and more variability in the nature of care demands. Policy trends, too, are probably increasing the demand for family care, but their effect on families’ caring capacity, and on caregivers’ lives, is unclear.» (p. iii)