Maternal Nonverbal Behaviours and Infant Gaze During Triadic Play With Toys at 5 and 12 Months

Maternal Nonverbal Behaviours and Infant Gaze During Triadic Play With Toys at 5 and 12 Months

Maternal Nonverbal Behaviours and Infant Gaze During Triadic Play With Toys at 5 and 12 Months

Maternal Nonverbal Behaviours and Infant Gaze During Triadic Play With Toys at 5 and 12 Monthss

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Référence bibliographique [6153]

Leiba, Elka. 2000. «Maternal Nonverbal Behaviours and Infant Gaze During Triadic Play With Toys at 5 and 12 Months». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de psychologie.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« [...] [T]he present study was designed to examine nonverbal communicative behaviours in mother-infant interactions, and investigate how mothers adjust their behaviours to the developmental level of their infants and similarly, how infant behaviours change over time. More specifically, nonverbal strategies that mothers use with toys to structure the attention of their infants within a free play context were examined. » (p iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Subjects were recruited from a community teaching hospital in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) and mothers were contacted and recruited by telephone. The original sample consisted of 28 mother-infant dyads, however, 2 dyads were not included in the study because they participated only 5 months. » (p. 31)

Instruments :
« All mother-infant interaction were recorded on Sony 8 mm video cassettes by a Sony Video Cassette camera. » (p. 32)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique et analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Investigations using the face-to-face procedure have demonstrated the importance of maternal nonverbal behaviours in mother-infant interactions, however, fewer studies have explored the contribution of maternal and infant nonverbal behaviours in play. [...] Gaze, an important index of attention was used to assess infant attentional behaviours. Given that the motivating force of play is affective in nature, the present study also measured active and passive affection to address the affective component of play between mothers and infants. Twenty-six mother-infant dyads were studied longitudinally at both 5 and 12 months and participated in an 8-minutes free play period that included age appropriate toys. The results from the present study indicated that mothers adjusted the duration and frequency with which they used the nonverbal behaviours to attract the attention of their infants and to teach them. These behaviours were also found to relate to infant gaze behaviours. The findings also indicate that mothers’ displays of active attention decreased over time while they maintained their use of passive attention at 5 and 12 months. Together, the results of this study illustrate the important role that maternal nonverbal behaviours have in mother-infant play interactions. Mothers adjust their behaviours to the age of their infants, implying that mothers are attuned to the developmental skills of their infants and also provide structure to further their abilities. The results from this study contribute toward a better understanding of the way in which mothers organize play interactions in ways that scaffold the attention of their infants, and teach them while maintaining emotional communication with their infants » (p. iii)