Parenting and Maternal Substance Addiction: Factors Affecting Utilization of Child Protective Services

Parenting and Maternal Substance Addiction: Factors Affecting Utilization of Child Protective Services

Parenting and Maternal Substance Addiction: Factors Affecting Utilization of Child Protective Services

Parenting and Maternal Substance Addiction: Factors Affecting Utilization of Child Protective Servicess

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The objective of this study is to identify which characteristics distinguish substance addicted mothers receiving child protection services from substance-addicted mothers not receiving such services. More precisely, the aim of this study is 1. to identify the personal and family characteristics of substance-addicted mothers that are or are not associated with the reception of child protection services; 2. to identify which of the personal and family characteristics associated with receiving child protection services have the strongest association. » (p. 1575)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Participants are 56 mothers with substance use and addiction-related problems, of whom 32 were receiving, voluntarily or otherwise, child protection services while 24 mothers had psychotropic drug use-related problems but were receiving no psychosocial services. Data were collected in the province of Quebec, Canada, between August 1998 and August 1999. » (p. 1572)

Instruments:
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The purpose of this study is to identify which personal, familial, environmental, and social factors are associated with the utilization of child protection services, including parental support programs, by mothers who misuse illicit substances. […] Results indicate that mothers who receive services are younger, have fewer interpersonal resources, live in lower socioeconomic conditions, and have greater family dysfunction (less parental supervision and more inconsistent discipline) than mothers who do not receive services from child protection agencies. However, there are no significant differences between groups with regards to maternal childhood trauma, psychological distress, antisocial behavior and the quality of the parent–child bond. The results of this study suggest that although both groups misuse drugs and have personal difficulties, some mothers will not need support from social services to take care of their children. » (p. 1572)