A new Typology of Fathering: Defining and Associated Variables

A new Typology of Fathering: Defining and Associated Variables

A new Typology of Fathering: Defining and Associated Variables

A new Typology of Fathering: Defining and Associated Variabless

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Référence bibliographique [6091]

Paquette, Daniel, Bolté, Christine, Turcotte, Geneviève, Dubeau, Diane et Bouchard, Camil. 2000. «A new Typology of Fathering: Defining and Associated Variables ». Infant and Child Development, vol. 9, p. 213-230.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This study of a large sample of two-parent, French Canadian families living in a disadvantaged environment, with at least one child between 0 and 6 years of age, aimed to verify the existence of different types of fathering on the basis of self-report measures of involvement and parental attitudes. » (p. 215)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
« 468 two-parent, French Canadian families with at least one child between 0 and 6 years of age, living in a disadvantaged environment. » (p. 215)

Instruments :
-Montreal Father’s Involvement Questionnaire
-Adult-adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI) (Bavolek, 1984)
-Attachment Style Questionnaire (Feeney et al., 1994)
-Parenting Stress Index (PSI) (validated for the French-speaking population of Québec by Bigras et al., 1996)
-Job Involvement Scale (Lodahl and Kejner, 1965)
-Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (Weiss et al., 1967)
-Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Scale (Locke and Wallace, 1959)
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Our goal was to identify different types of parenting based on self-report measures of fathers’ involvement and parental attitudes. The present investigation studies 468 two-parent, French Canadian families with at least one child between 0 and 6 years of age, living in a disadvantaged environment. The study, conducted on a sample of fathers, revealed the presence of the three basic types of parenting identified by Baumrind (authoritarian, authoritative and permissive), and also of a new type of parenting (stimulative parenting). The fathers in this latter group provide more emotional support to children and are more stimulating, as is evidenced by the greater psychological presence of children in the father’s cognitions and by the fact that they more frequently introduce their children to new activities. These fathers are characterized by more secure social relationships. The father’s parental stress level was found to be the most important variable discriminating between different types of fathering. Authoritarian and authoritative fathers are more at risk of maltreating their children because their more favourable attitude towards the use of physical punishment is combined with greater parental stress, less parental involvement of mothers, and a large number of children in the home. Authoritarian fathers are even more at risk of maltreating their children because of more difficult family socioeconomic conditions, particularly lower levels of maternal education and income. » (p. 213)