From Mother-Regulated to Child Regulated Joint Planning Activity: A Look at Familial Adversity and Attachment

From Mother-Regulated to Child Regulated Joint Planning Activity: A Look at Familial Adversity and Attachment

From Mother-Regulated to Child Regulated Joint Planning Activity: A Look at Familial Adversity and Attachment

From Mother-Regulated to Child Regulated Joint Planning Activity: A Look at Familial Adversity and Attachments

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Référence bibliographique [6085]

Parent, Sophie, Gosselin, Catherine et Moss, Ellen. 2000. «From Mother-Regulated to Child Regulated Joint Planning Activity: A Look at Familial Adversity and Attachment ». Revue canadienne de recherche en sciences infirmières / Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, vol. 21, no 4, p. 447-470.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The goal of this study was to investigate differences in joint planning as a function of both attachment and familial adversity during the transition from the preschool to the school-age period (4 to 7 years). » (p. 453)
Questions/Hypothèses :
« Based on previous literature (e.g., Moss et al, 1993; Stevenson-Hinde & Shouldice, 1995), we expected that within secure mother-child dyads, maternal teaching would be more supportive of children’s emerging cognitive competencies in a way that fosters the mastery of new skills. It was expected that these mothers would allow their children to engage in partially mastered skills and model the performance of more advanced skills. By early school age, in the context of a planning task: (a) these mothers would be more likely to model the performance of global planning skills compared with mothers of insecure children; (b) within secure dyads, children would be more likely to be involved in the performance of local planning strategies, and thus consolidate mastery of these skills; and (c) there would be no difference with regard to sharing of responsibility for plan execution as a function of attachment, because these skills should be already mastered by children of this age group.
A further research question concerned the contribution of familial adversity to differences in joint planning. Based on prevailing evidence, we expected that familial adversity would be related to a pattern of collaboration less supportive of child mastery of planning skills. This pattern could take the form of a lower frequency of maternal modeling of global planning skills or a higher frequency of maternal control or intrusion into the performance of local planning skills or plan execution. » (p. 453)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
91 mother-child dyads

Instruments :
- a sociodemographic questionnaire
- the Beck Depression Inventory (Beck et al., 1961)
- a videotape recorder
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu et analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The aim of this study was to examine how the quality of mother-child attachment and the level of familial adversity are related to differences in mother-child joint planning during the preschool period. Ninety-one 4- to 7-year-olds and their mothers participated in an errand-planning task. Four patterns of responsibility sharing in task resolution were compared as a function of attachment, level of familial adversity, and complexity of planning operations. Results indicated a familial adversity main effect with regard to observed patterns of responsibility sharing for global planning, with dyads from the high adversity group less likely to use these strategies. A significant main effect of attachment and a moderator effect were also found for patterns of responsibility sharing with respect to local planning. Taken together, these effects suggest that attachment security provides a better context for child participation in local planning operations within low adversity families. Findings highlight the relevance of examining the social context of parenting and suggest that educational strategies differ as a function of the larger social and economic context of family life. » (p. 447)