''Without Taking Away her Leave'': A Canadian Case Study of Couples’ Decisions on Fathers’ Use of Paid Parental Leave

''Without Taking Away her Leave'': A Canadian Case Study of Couples’ Decisions on Fathers’ Use of Paid Parental Leave

''Without Taking Away her Leave'': A Canadian Case Study of Couples’ Decisions on Fathers’ Use of Paid Parental Leave

''Without Taking Away her Leave'': A Canadian Case Study of Couples’ Decisions on Fathers’ Use of Paid Parental Leaves

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Référence bibliographique [598]

McKay, Lindsey et Doucet, Andrea. 2010. «''Without Taking Away her Leave'': A Canadian Case Study of Couples’ Decisions on Fathers’ Use of Paid Parental Leave ». Fathering, vol. 8, no 3, p. 300-320.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Our paper is rooted in an expanding international literature on specific policy provisions for parental leave and analyses of fathers’ use patterns. » (p. 301) « The study that informs this paper was motivated by a perceived need to explain why couples do not share leave-time and to explore when and why fathers do take leave. » (p. 314)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Between 2006 and 2008, we conducted in-depth couple interviews with 25 heterosexual birth parent couples and one gay male couple who are adoptive parents, using an interview guide with five open-ended themes. [...] Almost all lived in the Ottawa—Gatineau area, 16 in Ontario and 10 in Québec. » (p. 304)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« We make four arguments in this paper, which focus on the unique intersections between public policy, household finances, mother-led parenting in the first year, and embodiment as signified in breastfeeding. Our research found that while fathers and mothers both express a desire to care for their infant children, both men and women allow mothers’ leave-taking desire to trump that of fathers. This deference to traditional roles in the first year is influenced by many factors, including breastfeeding as well as social norms and ideologies relating to gender and infant care. Specifically, most men did not see taking leave from work to care for a newborn as an obligation of fatherhood. Rather, being a good father meant earning money and not taking leave time away from mothers. These views were reinforced by workplace and community norms. Traditional leave patterns between fathers and mothers were rewarded more often whereas defying tradition was more likely to bring negative reactions. One father who took leave lost his job. One mother who returned to work was chastised as irresponsible for leaving her newborn with the father. Moreover, while we began our study with a focus on couple negotiations, what also emerged from our research is that individuals also negotiated as individual workers and community members and sometimes struggled with the norms and ideologies at play in both of these social institutions. » (p. 316-7)