Disentangling the Link between Disrupted Families and Delinquency

Disentangling the Link between Disrupted Families and Delinquency

Disentangling the Link between Disrupted Families and Delinquency

Disentangling the Link between Disrupted Families and Delinquencys

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Référence bibliographique [5760]

Juby, Heather et Farrington, David P. 2001. «Disentangling the Link between Disrupted Families and Delinquency ». British Journal of Criminology, vol. 41, no 1, p. 22-40.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The main aim of this paper is to disentangle these different family experiences. » (p. 23)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« The most basic hypothesis to be tested is, of course:
(1) Is delinquency more common among boys from permanently disrupted families (broken homes) compared to boys from intact families?
Two hypotheses particularly relevant to trauma theories are as follows:
(2) Are delinquency rates higher among boys from families disrupted by parental disharmony rather than death?
(3) Are delinquency rates higher among boys who lose their mother as opposed to their father?
Four hypotheses particularly relevant to life course theories are as follows:
(4) How does the boy’s age at the time of the family disruption affect his risk of delinquency?
(5) Are delinquency rates differents according to whether the boy remains with the mother or the father after the separations? (This is, of course, linked to hypothesis 3.)
(6) Are boys who remain with lone mothers less delinquent than boys with mothers and stepfathers?
(7) How does the post-disruption family trajectory influence delinquent development? How is delinquency affected by the number and type of post-disruption family transitions?
Two hypotheses particularly relevant to selection theories are as follows:
(8) Is delinquency more common among boys from disrupted families than among boys in high-conflict intact families?
(9) Do relationships between family disruption and delinquency disappear after controlling for other important predictors of delinquency, such as low family income, criminal parents, poor parental supervision, and hyperactivity, troublesomeness and low intelligence of the boy?
The final hypothesis is important in view of the history of criminological search on broken homes and delinquency:
(10) Do results obtained with juvenile convictions differ from those obtained with juvenile self-reported delinquency or adult convictions? »(pp. 26-27)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The Cambridge Study in Delinquent Developement is a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males from age 8 to age 46 » (p. 22)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development is a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males from age 8 to age 46. Delinquency rates were higher among 75 boys who were living in permanently disrupted families on their fifteenth birthday, compared to boys living in intact families. Results were very similar whether juvenile convictions, juvenile self-reported delinquency or adult convictions were studied. Delinquency rates were similar in disrupted families and in intact high conflict families. Boys who lost their mothers were more likely to be delinquent than boys who lost their fathers, and disruptions caused by parental disharmony were more damaging than disruptions caused by parental death. Boys from disrupted families who continued living with their mothers had similar delinquency rates to boys from intact harmonious families. These results are more concordant with life course theories rather than with trauma theories or selection theories of the effects of family disruption. » (p. 22)