Enthusiasm and Moral Commitment: What Sustains Family Caregivers of Those with Dementia

Enthusiasm and Moral Commitment: What Sustains Family Caregivers of Those with Dementia

Enthusiasm and Moral Commitment: What Sustains Family Caregivers of Those with Dementia

Enthusiasm and Moral Commitment: What Sustains Family Caregivers of Those with Dementias

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Référence bibliographique [5647]

Pierce, Tamarha, Lydon, John E. et Yang, Seungmi. 2001. «Enthusiasm and Moral Commitment: What Sustains Family Caregivers of Those with Dementia ». Basic and Applied Social Psychology, vol. 23, no 1, p. 29-41.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The purpose of this study is to further our understanding of the factors associated with the well-being of family caregivers of persons with dementia by examining the contributions of commitment and self-determination theory. » (p. 30)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« H1: Primary caregivers have a higher level of moral commitment than nonprimary caregivers do.
H2: Whereas moral commitment is not associated with primary caregivers’ psychological well-being, greater enthusiasm toward the patient and the provision of care is associated with greater well-being in primary caregivers.
H3: An identified but not introjected motivation for caregiving is associated with primary caregivers’s well-being.
H4: Enthusiasm and moral commitment both are correlated with and identified internalization of the caregiving role.
H5: Identified motives for caregiving give rise to enthusiastic commitment such that the association between identified internalization and well-being is mediated by enthusiasm toward the patient and the provision of care.
H6a: Identified motives for caregiving and enthusiasm are associated with the appraised threat of potentially problematic situations, with enthusiasm mediating the association beween identification and threat appraisals.
H6b: Decreased threat appraisal is the process by which enthusiasm enhances well-being.
H7: Moral commitment increases the appraised challenge of potentially problematic situations, which is unrelated to primary caregivers’ well-being. » (p. 32)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
-37 primary caregivers

Instruments :
Questionnaires et guides d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Elderly (n=22) and young (n=15) primary family caregivers of persons diagnosed with dementia and nonprimary caregivers (n=13) were interviewed to assess their commitment to caregiving, internalization of the caregiving role (i.e., autonomy and self-determination), well-being, and appraisal of problematic situations. Primary caregivers reported a higher level of moral commitment than nonprimary caregivers. Young primary caregivers experienced more negative affect and less enthusiasm about caregiving and their relationship with the patient than other caregivers. Regression analyses suggest that greater identification with caregiving may generate enthusiasm, which in turn seems to foster well-being in primary caregivers and dampen their appraised threat of problematic situations. Finally, a tendency to appraise difficult situations as challenges when highly morally committed might explain primary caregivers’ persistence. » (p. 29)