Poverty, Family Process, and the Mental Health of Immigrant Children in Canada

Poverty, Family Process, and the Mental Health of Immigrant Children in Canada

Poverty, Family Process, and the Mental Health of Immigrant Children in Canada

Poverty, Family Process, and the Mental Health of Immigrant Children in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [5503]

Beiser, Morton, Hou, Feng, Hyman, Ilene et Tousignant, Michel. 2002. «Poverty, Family Process, and the Mental Health of Immigrant Children in Canada ». American Journal of Public Health, vol. 92, no 2, p. 220-227.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In this study we examined putative explanatory links between poverty and mental health among immigrant children, Canadian-born children in immigrant families, and non-immigrant children. Previous research high-lights the importance of ethnocultural context in exploring etiologic links, so we explore possible differences among immigrant and nonimmigrant children from varying ethnocultural backgrounds. » (p. 220)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
« Our study data arrive from the first cycle of Statistics Canada’s and the Department of Human Resources Development’s National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), a national study of 23 000 children ranging in age from birth through 11 years. [...] This report focuses on subgroups. Immigrant children (IC) are born in a foreign country to non-Canadian parents and living in Canada at the time of the study. This group (n=684) makes up 5.1% of the total weighted sample. Canadian-born children of immigrant parents (CBI) are children born in Canada to a family in which at least 1 of the parents entered the country as an immigrant (n=2573), 19.3% of the total). Nonimmigrant children (NI) are Canadian-born offspring of Canadian-born parents (n=10 092, 75.6% of the total). » (p. 221)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Objectives. This study examined the differential effects of poverty on the mental health of foreign-born children, Canadian-born children of immigrant parents, and children of nonimmigrant parents.
Methods. Secondary analysis of data from a national Canadian study of children between 4 and 11 years of age was conducted.
Results. Compared with their receiving-society counterparts, foreign-born children were more than twice as likely to live in poor families, but they had lower levels of emotional and behavioral problems. The effect of poverty on children’s mental health among long-term immigrant and receiving-society families was indirect and primarily mediated by single-parent status, ineffective parenting, parental depression, and family dysfunction. In comparison, the mental health effect of poverty among foreign-born children could not be explained by the disadvantages that poor families often suffer.
Conclusions. Poverty may represent a transient and inevitable part of the resettlement process for new immigrant families. For long-stay immigrant and receiving-society families, however, poverty probably is not part of an unfolding process; instead, it is the nadir of a cycle of disadvantage. » (p. 220)