Characterization of Household Food Insecurity in Quebec: Food and Feelings

Characterization of Household Food Insecurity in Quebec: Food and Feelings

Characterization of Household Food Insecurity in Quebec: Food and Feelings

Characterization of Household Food Insecurity in Quebec: Food and Feelingss

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Référence bibliographique [5320]

Hamelin, Anne-Marie, Beaudry, Micheline et Habicht, Jean Pierre. 2002. «Characterization of Household Food Insecurity in Quebec: Food and Feelings ». Social Science and Medicine, vol. 54, no 1, p. 119-132.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This study was undertaken to understand food insecurity from the perspective of households who experienced it. » (p. 119)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
98 respondents taken from « 23 group interviews (three to six respondents in each) and 12 individual interviews » (p. 120)

Instruments :
« A French version of the Radimer/Cornell Hunger and Food Insecurity Measure (Olson, Frongillo, & Kendall, 1994; Radimer et al., 1992) » (p. 120)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique et analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« The results of group interviews and personal interviews with 98 low-income households from urban and rural areas in and around Quebec City, Canada, elicited the meaning of ’enough food’ for the households and the range of manifestations of food insecurity. Two classes of manifestations characterized the experience of food insecurity: (1) its core characteristics: a lack of food encompassing the shortage of food, the unsuitability of both food and diet and a preoccupation with continuity in access to enough food: and a lack of control of households over their food situation; and (2) a related set of potential reactions: socio-familial perturbations, hunger and physical impairment, and psychological suffering. The results substantiate the existence of food insecurity among Quebecers and confirm that the nature of this experience is consistent with many of the core components identified in upstate New York. This study underlines the monotony of the diet, describes the feeling of alienation, differentiates between a lack of food and the reactions that it engenders, and emphasizes the dynamic nature of the experience. » (p. 119)