Family Fortunes and Religious Identity: The French-Canadian Protestants of South Ely, Quebec, 1850-1901

Family Fortunes and Religious Identity: The French-Canadian Protestants of South Ely, Quebec, 1850-1901

Family Fortunes and Religious Identity: The French-Canadian Protestants of South Ely, Quebec, 1850-1901

Family Fortunes and Religious Identity: The French-Canadian Protestants of South Ely, Quebec, 1850-1901s

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [5312]

Hudon, Christine. 2002. «Family Fortunes and Religious Identity: The French-Canadian Protestants of South Ely, Quebec, 1850-1901». Dans Households of Faith: Family, Gender and Community in Canada, 1760-1969 , sous la dir. de Nancy Christie, p. 138-166. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This essay adopt a social-historical perspective and examines the demographic and dimensions of religious membership and identity through a local community study of French-speaking Protestants in Quebec. » (p. 138)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« The purpose is to shed light on the experience of a religious minority whose existence has for many years been erased from collective memory and only recently rediscovered by historians. » (p. 138)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« [...] [T]his study relies upon the manuscript censuses from 1851 to 1901, as well as the registers of baptisms, marriages and burials of a large number of Catholic and Protestant parishes in the Richelieu-Yamaska region and in the Eastern Townships. An analysis of newspapers, especially L’Aurore, published in Montreal from 1866, also enables the historian to trace the movements of a number of families. Obituaries and social columns provide information vital to any reconstitution of family migration within Quebec’s Protestant community. » (p. 139)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« This essay, based on parish registers, censuses and newspapers, has attempted to trace the life course of three generations of francophone Protestants established at South Ely, a small community in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. By using hitherto untapped sources, this particular example has attempted to illuminate the experience of a minority group and to determine to what extent it differed from that of Quebec’s Catholics. In this study, missionaries and the clergy have been deliberately left out, as I have wanted above all to highlight the fortunes of the Protestant converts and their families. » (p. 160)