A Comparison of Fathers’ and Mothers’ Involvement in Childcare and Stimulation Behaviors During Free-play with their Infants at 9 and 15 Months

A Comparison of Fathers’ and Mothers’ Involvement in Childcare and Stimulation Behaviors During Free-play with their Infants at 9 and 15 Months

A Comparison of Fathers’ and Mothers’ Involvement in Childcare and Stimulation Behaviors During Free-play with their Infants at 9 and 15 Months

A Comparison of Fathers’ and Mothers’ Involvement in Childcare and Stimulation Behaviors During Free-play with their Infants at 9 and 15 Monthss

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Référence bibliographique [5280]

Laflamme, Darquise, Pomerleau, Andrée et Malcuit, Gérard. 2002. «A Comparison of Fathers’ and Mothers’ Involvement in Childcare and Stimulation Behaviors During Free-play with their Infants at 9 and 15 Months ». Sex Roles, vol. 47, no 11-12, p. 507-518.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« As parents’ level of involvement may influence their interactive style we conducted analyses to examine the relationship between these two types of measures (questionnaire based data and direct observation during free-play). » (p. 509)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
87 familles

Instruments :
- Demographic questionnaire
- Parental Resposibility Scale (PRS) (McBride & Mills, 1993);
- Daily Journal, inspired by the work of Leroux, Malcuit, Pormerleau & Nantel (1993), to determine the amount of time each parent was accessible to the infant;
- videotapes of father-infant and mother-infant free-play.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique et analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Fathers and mothers of 87 1st-born infants completed a parental responsibility questionnaire; recorded accessibility and direct interaction time in caregiving, play, and outings; and were videotaped in a free-play session with their infants at 9 and 15 month of age. Analyses compared fathers’ & mothers’ involvement and interactive behaviors, and examined age and gender infant effects. At both times, fathers reported being less accessible to their infants and spending less time in direct interaction with them than did mothers. During times when both parents were available to the infant, fathers were less likely to provide basic care, but spent an equivalent amount of time in play and outings. Fathers in dual-earner families spent less time in accessibility, caregiving, and outings, but engaged in as much play as mothers. Responsibility for discipline was rated as being equally shared amongst parents. During play, parents did not differ in the amount of physical contact, conventional play, nonconventional play, and attempts to direct the infant’s attention. However, fathers vocalized less and made fewer requests than mothers. Differences between paternal and maternal involvement in childcare and stimulation behaviors are discussed with respect to infant age and gender.» (p. 507)