Perceived Parental Child Rearing and Suicidal Ideation in Chinese Adolescents

Perceived Parental Child Rearing and Suicidal Ideation in Chinese Adolescents

Perceived Parental Child Rearing and Suicidal Ideation in Chinese Adolescents

Perceived Parental Child Rearing and Suicidal Ideation in Chinese Adolescentss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [5054]

Wong, Iris N., de Man, Anton F. et Leung, Patrick W. L. 2002. «Perceived Parental Child Rearing and Suicidal Ideation in Chinese Adolescents ». Social Behavior and Personality, vol. 30, no 1, p. 19-24.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Because of these differences in cultural beliefs, socialization, and child-rearing practices, the findings regarding the relationship between parental child-rearing and suicidal ideation may not necessarily be applicable to non Western societies. With this in mind, the present study evaluated the relationship between maternal and paternal child-rearing attitudes and the presence of suicidal ideation in Chinese (Hong Kong) adolescents. » (p. 21)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
365 adolescents chinois (178 garçons et 187 filles)

Instruments :
- Warmth/Affection subscale of the child version of the Parental Acceptance-Rejection Questionnaire (PARQ; Rohner, 1986);
- Adolescent subscale of the Autonomy-Control Scale (de Man, 1987, 1988);
- Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI; de Man & Leduc, 1994).
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Three hundred & sixty-five Chinese adolescent boys & girls participated in a study of the relationship between perceived maternal & paternal warmth & control in child rearing, & suicidal ideation. Results of correlation & stepwise multiple regression analyses of data generated by the Parental Acceptance-Rejection Questionnaire, the Autonomy-Control Scale, & the Scale for Suicide Ideation showed that Chinese adolescents who experienced their mothers as less warm & affectionate tended to suffer from greater suicidal ideation, with girls generally reporting higher levels of ideation than boys. » (p. 19)