Bridging the Attachment Transmission Gap: The Role of Maternal Mind-mindedness

Bridging the Attachment Transmission Gap: The Role of Maternal Mind-mindedness

Bridging the Attachment Transmission Gap: The Role of Maternal Mind-mindedness

Bridging the Attachment Transmission Gap: The Role of Maternal Mind-mindednesss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [5020]

Bernier, Annie et Dozier, Mary. 2003. «Bridging the Attachment Transmission Gap: The Role of Maternal Mind-mindedness ». International Journal of Behavioral Development, vol. 27, no 4, p. 355-365.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The goal of the present study is to examine whether this association is accounted for by the mother’s representation of the child, as evidenced in her description of the child. » (p. 358)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
« Sixty-four foster infant–mother dyads participated in this study as part of a larger longitudinal study of children in foster care (Dozier et al., 2001). All 64 infants had been placed with their caregivers between birth and 19 months of age, with a mean age at placement of 6.4 months (SD = 5.4). Forty-one of the children were boys and 23 girls. Most (67%) of the infants were African-American, with 16% European-American, 11% biracial, and 6% Hispanic. Similarly, most (63%) of the foster mothers were African-American, 35% European-American, and 2% Hispanic. » (p. 358)

Instruments :
- Adult Attachment Interview (AAI: George et al.,1996);
- « Using the Main and Goldwyn (1998) system, individuals are classified as autonomous with regard to attachment, dismissing of attachment, preoccupied with attachment, or unresolved with respect to a loss or a trauma. » (p. 359);
- This Is My Baby interview (TIMB). The TIMB (Bates & Dozier, in press).
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu et analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The intergenerational transmission of attachment patterns is one of the most reliable yet least understood findings of attachment research. The aim of this report was to examine the capacity of maternal mind-mindedness to account for the relation between adult attachment state of mind and infant attachment security. Sixty-four foster children (aged 6-30 months) participated with their foster mothers. The mother’s tendency to use mental features in describing her child (mind-mindedness) was negatively related to the security of both maternal state of mind and infant attachment. Further, mind-mindedness accounted for the totality of the predictive power of state of mind on infant attachment. The results suggest that age-appropriate representations of the child may help explain intergenerational transmission, through their interplay with parental interactive behaviours. » (p. 355)