Influences of Context and Age on Maternal Request Strategies and Child Compliance and Noncompliance in a High-risk Intergenerational Sample

Influences of Context and Age on Maternal Request Strategies and Child Compliance and Noncompliance in a High-risk Intergenerational Sample

Influences of Context and Age on Maternal Request Strategies and Child Compliance and Noncompliance in a High-risk Intergenerational Sample

Influences of Context and Age on Maternal Request Strategies and Child Compliance and Noncompliance in a High-risk Intergenerational Samples

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Référence bibliographique [4818]

Grunzeweig, Naomi. 2003. «Influences of Context and Age on Maternal Request Strategies and Child Compliance and Noncompliance in a High-risk Intergenerational Sample». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de psychologie.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The current study was designed to address two main objectives. The first objective was to investigate the relationships among maternal requests, child compliance and noncompliance, play context, and child age. [...] The second objective was to investigate the relationships among maternal childhood levels of aggression and withdrawal, maternal request strategies, and child compliance and noncompliance. » (p. 16)
Questions/Hypothèses :
« Hypothesis 1. It was predicted that the rate and frequency of maternal requests would vary according to request strategy, play context, and child age. Specifically, mothers would make the most requests in the command task, followed by the puzzle task, and then the free play. In addition, mothers would use guidance and control requests more than physical intervention requests.
Hypothesis 2. It was expected that the frequency of child compliance with maternal requests would vary according to request strategy, play context, and child age. Specifically, it was predicted that older children would comply with maternal requests more frequently than younger children.
Hypothesis 3. It was anticipated that the frequency of noncompliant responses to maternal requests would vary according to request strategy, noncompliance strategy, play context, and child age. Specifically, it was expected that children would display passive noncompliance most, followed by self-assertion, and then defiance. In addition, it was predicted that older children would use more self-assertion and less passive noncompliance than younger children.
Hypothesis 4. It was expected that maternal childhood levels of aggression and withdrawal would contribute to the prediction of maternal requests. Specifically, mothers high on aggression and withdrawal would employ more negative requests, i.e. physical interventions and no opportunity requests.
Hypothesis 5. It was anticipated that maternal childhood levels of aggression and withdrawal and maternal request strategies would contribute to the prediction of child compliance with maternal requests. More specifically, low levels of aggression and withdrawal would predict high levels of compliance with maternal requests.
Hypothesis 6. It was expected that maternal childhood levels of aggression and withdrawal and maternal request strategies would contribute to the prediction of non compliant responses to maternal requests. More specifically, high levels of aggression and high levels of negative request strategies would predict high levels of defiance. » (p. 17-18)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
74 mères du Concordia Longitudinal study et leurs enfants (34 garçons et 40 filles, âgés entre 2 et 6 ans)

Instruments :
- a Demographic Information Questionnaire (DIQ: Cooperman, 1996)
- the Request/Compliance Coding Scheme (RCCS: Crockenberg & Litman, 1990; Donovan et al. 2000; Kuczynski & Kochanska, 1990).
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique et analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Compliance and noncompliance with maternal requests represent key milestones in children’s social development. The objectives of the present study were to: (1) investigate whether maternal requests; and child compliance and noncompliance vary according to play context, maternal request strategy, child noncompliance strategy, and child age, and (2) examine the contribution of maternal childhood histories of aggression and withdrawal to the prediction of maternal request strategies and child compliance and noncompliance.
Participants were recruited from the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Project, which began in 1977 when children in Grades 1, 4, or 7 from disadvantaged neighbourhoods were classified along dimensions of aggression and social withdrawal. Seventy-four mothers were videotaped in their homes while they interacted with their children (aged 2 to 6 years) during three play contexts: a puzzle task, a free play, and a command task. Maternal request strategies and child compliance and noncompliance were coded using the Request/Compliance Coding Scheme.
In general, the results supported the hypotheses that (1) child compliance and noncompliance are related to maternal request strategies, which vary according to child age and play context, and that (2) maternal childhood histories of social withdrawal contribute to the prediction of request strategies, which serve to predict child compliance and noncompliance. Taken together, these results elucidate the role of play context in the development of compliance with maternal requests, and broaden the current understanding of the pathways towards maladaptive and healthy social development. Furthermore, these results have implications for early interventions and parent training programs. » (pp. iii-iv)