Epidemiological Considerations in the Conceptualization and Utilization of ''Prevalence'' and ''Incidence Rate'' in Family Violence Research: A Reply to Brownridge and Halli (1999)

Epidemiological Considerations in the Conceptualization and Utilization of ''Prevalence'' and ''Incidence Rate'' in Family Violence Research: A Reply to Brownridge and Halli (1999)

Epidemiological Considerations in the Conceptualization and Utilization of ''Prevalence'' and ''Incidence Rate'' in Family Violence Research: A Reply to Brownridge and Halli (1999)

Epidemiological Considerations in the Conceptualization and Utilization of ''Prevalence'' and ''Incidence Rate'' in Family Violence Research: A Reply to Brownridge and Halli (1999)s

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Référence bibliographique [4807]

Hélie, Sonia, Clément, Marie-Ève et Larrivée, Marie-Claude. 2003. «Epidemiological Considerations in the Conceptualization and Utilization of ''Prevalence'' and ''Incidence Rate'' in Family Violence Research: A Reply to Brownridge and Halli (1999) ». Journal of Family Violence, vol. 18, no 4, p. 219-225.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The purpose of this paper is to clarify concepts and stimulate thought on the use of frequency measures in the area of family violence, on the basis of what is already know in epidemiologic research. First, we shall illustrate how epidemiology can help us better to conceptualize and make use the measures of incidence and prevalence. Second, we shall refer to the child abuse and neglect literature to show how some studies are inconsistent with fundamental concepts in epidemiology. Finally, we shall discuss how epidemiologic frequency measures may be adapted to violence research. » (p. 219)

2. Méthode



Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


« Brownridge and Halli (1999) have argued that the literature on family violence is beset by confusion in the conceptualization and utilization of incidence and prevalence terminology. Although we basically agree with the authors’ diagnosis of the field, definitions of prevalence and incidence that they propose as gold standards are sometimes discrepant with established concepts in epidemiology. Drawing on the epidemiologic literature, we present more solidly based and operational definitions of these terms and try to understand the meaning of each measure. The same confusion surrounding use of prevalence and incidence also reigns in child maltreatment research, as revealed in our review of major studies. We address some of the main but often overlooked issues associated with use of epidemiologic measures in an area of social research such as family violence and make some proposals. » (p. 219)