From the King’s Daughters to the Quiet Revolution: a Historical Overview of Family Structures and the Role of Women in Quebec

From the King’s Daughters to the Quiet Revolution: a Historical Overview of Family Structures and the Role of Women in Quebec

From the King’s Daughters to the Quiet Revolution: a Historical Overview of Family Structures and the Role of Women in Quebec

From the King’s Daughters to the Quiet Revolution: a Historical Overview of Family Structures and the Role of Women in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [4774]

Krull, Catherine. 2003. «From the King’s Daughters to the Quiet Revolution: a Historical Overview of Family Structures and the Role of Women in Quebec». Dans Voices: Essays on Canadian Families , sous la dir. de Marion Lynn, p. 369-394. Scarborough (Ontario): Nelson Thomson.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
Mesurer l’impact de la Révolution tranquille sur la structure des familles québécoises et sur la définition du rôle des femmes; situer ces transformations par rapport au Canada.

Questions/Hypothèses :
« Although the Quiet Revolution and the women’s movement cannot be viewed as linear processes that affected all individuals in the same way at a specific time, it cannot be denied that both these processes of social change had considerable impact on Quebec society, especially in terms of changing the attitudes, values, and behaviors of many individuals. » (p. 391)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Characteristic of families in Quebec have dramatically changed since the Quiet Revolution of the early 1960’s. Quebec now has the lowest fertility rates, the highest cohabitation rate, and one of the highest divorce rates in Canada. What is most amazing about these changes is the relatively short period of time in which they took place. In a matter of few decades, Quebec’s traditional family structures have become indistinguishable form those in other industrialized societies. » (pp. 390-391) These transformations seem to be the result of « [...] the declining power of the traditional patriarchal institutions such as the state and the Catholic Church. Prior to the Quiet Revolution, the society’s values and attitudes towards women’s role […] and toward family formation and family size were heavily influenced by the authority of these institutions. However, with the rise of the competing institutions and collectivities such as agencies for educational reform, feminist groups, political-revolutionary groups, and egalitarian/female-healed families, the authority of traditional institutions and collectivities weakened. » (p. 391)