Individual Differences in Infant Still-face Response at 6 Months

Individual Differences in Infant Still-face Response at 6 Months

Individual Differences in Infant Still-face Response at 6 Months

Individual Differences in Infant Still-face Response at 6 Monthss

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Référence bibliographique [4529]

Tarabulsy, George M., Provost, Marc A., Deslandes, Julie, St-Laurent, Diane, Moss, Ellen, Lemelin, Jean Pascal, Bernier, Annie et Dassylva, Jean-François. 2003. «Individual Differences in Infant Still-face Response at 6 Months ». Infant Behavior & Development, vol. 26, no 3, p. 421-436.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The general objective of this study is to examine the proposition that infant still-face response is linked to the quality of maternal interactive behavior assessed outside the SFP. » (pp. 422-423)

2. Méthode



Échantillon/Matériau :
« Seventy-six mothers agreed to participate in this study with their 6-month-old infants. [...]
Adult mothers (N = 35) had a mean age of 29 years (SD = 4.4) and 15 years of schooling (SD = 3.1) at the birth of their child. [...]
Adolescent mothers (N = 41) had a mean age of 17 years (SD = 1.56) and had spent 10 (SD = 1.7) years in school. » (p. 426)

Instruments :
- Maternal Behavior Q-Set (MBQS : Pederson & Moran, 1995);
- Infant characteristics questionnaire (ICQ : Bates, Freeland, & Lounsbury, 1979);
- Still-face procedure (Tronick et al., 1978).
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique et analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« This study examined the association between infant still-face response and assessments of maternal behavior taken outside the still-face procedure (SFP). We also addressed the contributions of risk status and infant difficultness. Forty-one adolescent mother-infant dyads (high risk), and thirty-five adult mother-infant dyads (low risk) were seen when infants were 6 months old. Home visits were carried out to obtain maternal ratings of infant difficultness and to conduct observations of maternal interactive behavior. The SFP was conducted at the university two weeks later. Infant still-face response was coded for positive affect, negative affect and self-soothing behavior. Regression analyses revealed that maternal behavior was associated with negative affect and self-soothing behavior. In both cases risk status significantly moderated these effects. Infant difficultness significantly moderated the association between maternal behavior and self-soothing behavior, and marginally moderated the link between maternal behavior and negative affect. » (p. 421)