Parental Overweight/Obesity, Social Factors, and Child Overweight/Obesity at 7 Years of Age

Parental Overweight/Obesity, Social Factors, and Child Overweight/Obesity at 7 Years of Age

Parental Overweight/Obesity, Social Factors, and Child Overweight/Obesity at 7 Years of Age

Parental Overweight/Obesity, Social Factors, and Child Overweight/Obesity at 7 Years of Ages

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Référence bibliographique [43]

Xu, Li, Dubois, Lise, Burnier, Daniel, Girard, Manon et Prud’homme, Denis. 2011. «Parental Overweight/Obesity, Social Factors, and Child Overweight/Obesity at 7 Years of Age ». Pediatrics International, vol. 53, no 6, p. 826-831.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study used gender-based analyses to examine whether child overweight/obesity is related to parental overweight/obesity and sociodemographic factors, in a representative population-based cohort of 7-year-old children.» (p. 826)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The present study used data from the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development 1998–2010, conducted by Santé Québec, a division of the Institut de la Statistique du Québec. It followed a representative sample (n = 2103) of children born in 1998 in the Canadian province of Québec […]. The representative sample was chosen by randomly selecting children born throughout the year in each public health region of Québec during 1998.» (p. 827)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Authors conclude that «[g]ender differences in socialization may explain why at 7 years of age, girls’ bodyweight is influenced by having even one overweight/obese parent (mother or father), while boys’ bodyweight appears to be influenced only by father’s overweight/obesity when only one parent is overweight/obese.» (p. 826) They explained that «[i]f modeling is a powerful means of transmitting values, beliefs or practices, research has shown that the tendency to imitate the same-sex model is stronger for boys than for girls. This can be explained by the fact that girls are socialized to show equal cooperation and compliance with the requests of both of their parents, while boys show significantly higher levels of compliance to their father. Also, boys – more than girls – are discouraged by their peers and parents, especially fathers, to adopt stereotypical behaviors from the other sex.» (p. 827)