Family Background and Access to Post-Secondary Education: What Happened over the 1990s?

Family Background and Access to Post-Secondary Education: What Happened over the 1990s?

Family Background and Access to Post-Secondary Education: What Happened over the 1990s?

Family Background and Access to Post-Secondary Education: What Happened over the 1990s?s

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Référence bibliographique [4285]

Finnie, Ross, Laporte, Christine et Lascelles, Eric. 2004. Family Background and Access to Post-Secondary Education: What Happened over the 1990s?. Ottawa (Ontario): Gouvernement du Canada, Statistique Canada, Direction des études analytiques.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper presents new evidence on the relationships between access to post-secondary education and family background. […] We [...] analyse participation rates first in 1991, and then almost a decade later in 2000. » (résumé, p. 4)

2. Méthode


Échantillon :
« School Leavers Survey (SLS) and the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) » (résumé, p. 4)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The results of the analysis show that « overall, post-secondary education participation rates rose over this period [1991-2000]. However,participation is strongly related to parents’ education, and whereas participation increased for individuals with more highly educated parents (especially those who went to university), they increased rather less, or in some cases (especially for males) declined for those from lower parental education families. The already strong ’effect’ of parents’ education on post-secondary access became even greater over the 1990s. Participation rates are also strongly related to family type, but whereas those from two parent families continue to have an advantage over single mother families, the gap generally shrunk over the 1990s, especially where the mother had university level schooling. We also find a number of interesting trends by province. » (résumé, p. 4)