Projet familles de demain : un sondage sur les espoirs et les rêves des Canadiens / The Future Families Project: A Survey of Canadian Hopes and Dreams

Projet familles de demain : un sondage sur les espoirs et les rêves des Canadiens / The Future Families Project: A Survey of Canadian Hopes and Dreams

Projet familles de demain : un sondage sur les espoirs et les rêves des Canadiens / The Future Families Project: A Survey of Canadian Hopes and Dreams

Projet familles de demain : un sondage sur les espoirs et les rêves des Canadiens / The Future Families Project: A Survey of Canadian Hopes and Dreams s

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Référence bibliographique [4229]

Institut Vanier de la famille / Vanier Institute of the Family. 2004. Projet familles de demain : un sondage sur les espoirs et les rêves des Canadiens / The Future Families Project: A Survey of Canadian Hopes and Dreams . Ottawa: Institut Vanier de la famille / Vanier Institute of the Family.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« [...] [W]e wanted to get a clear reading on what Canadians want from family life. » (p. 100)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« A total of 2,093 adults eighteen and over participated in the survey » (p. viii)

Instruments :
Questionnaire The Future Families Project. A Survey of Canadian Hopes and Dreams

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« That enduring strength is readily arrarent in our survey results. Contrary to much of what is being written and said, we have found considerable consensus in the way Canadians conceptualize families, as well as in what they want from family life. Sociologist Robert Brym has been among those who have cautionned about prematurely assuming the demise of the family. In his words, the available evidence « should not lead one to conclude that the family is in a state of collapse. The overwhelming majority of adults still want to marry and have children. » Brym adds, ’The family is not a crumbling institution. What is happening, however, is that people are freer than they once were to establish the kinds of family arrangements that best suit them.’ » (p. 100)