Antisocial Behavior and High School Social Climate: A 10 Year Longitudinal and Multilevel Study

Antisocial Behavior and High School Social Climate: A 10 Year Longitudinal and Multilevel Study

Antisocial Behavior and High School Social Climate: A 10 Year Longitudinal and Multilevel Study

Antisocial Behavior and High School Social Climate: A 10 Year Longitudinal and Multilevel Studys

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Référence bibliographique [4188]

LeBlanc, Line, Swisher, Raymond, Vitaro, Frank et Tremblay, Richard E. 2004. «Antisocial Behavior and High School Social Climate: A 10 Year Longitudinal and Multilevel Study». Dans Le climat social des écoles secondaires, les problèmes de comportement en classe et les comportements antisociaux , sous la dir. de Line LeBlanc, p. 94-128. Montréal: Université de Montréal.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The aim of the present study is to use longitudinal data on a large sample of children followed from kindergarten to high school, and a multilevel modeling approach to test the extent to which particular dimensions of high school social climate are associated with antisocial behavior, controlling for individual and family risk factors, as well as school composition. » (p. 98)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« To briefly recap, we use a longitudinal study from childhood to adolescence, as well as multilevel statistical modelling in order to address the following questions: 1) What proportion of the total variance in antisocial behavior reported by adolescents can be attribute to differences between individuals within the same schools and to differences between schools? 2) Which dimensions fo high school social climate are associated with antisocial behavior? 3) To what extent are the relationship between dimensions of school social climate and students’ antisocial behavior independent of students’ individual and family risk factors? » (p. 101)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Subjects were part of a longitudinal study of children, followed from kindergarten to mid-adolescence, from French-language schools in the Province of Quebec, Canada (Côté et al., 2002; Zocolillo et al., 1999). Our analysis is based on high school that were attended by at least 5 students from the longitudinal study and that offered social climate data from at least 5 teachers. These criteria generated a total of 217 high schools and 1233 students (594 girls and 639 boys). » (pp. 101-102)

Instruments :
« - Youth antisocial behaviors: A French translation of the DISC-2 (Shaffer et al., 1991) was used to interview the subjects. This instrument evaluates the presence of symptoms along Axis 1 of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-Third Edition Revised (1987). » (p. 103)
« - High school social climate: The quality of a school’s social climate was measured using a questionnaire developed by Willms for a national longitudinal study of a random sample of Canadian children (National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, 1996). » (p. 104)
« - Disruptive behavior in elementary school: Elementary school teachers evaluated students’ behavior in terms of physical aggression, opposition, and hyperactivity annually from age 6 (end of kindergarten) up until 12 years of age. » (p. 105)
« - Family adversity: During the first round of data collection in kindergarten, mothers were asked questions regarding the structure of the family unit, the level of education of both parents, the jobs held by the parents, and the age of the parents at the birth of their first child. The information obtained for these variables was used to create an index of family adversity (Tremblay et al., 1991). » (p. 107)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« A longitudinal and multilevel approach was used to examine the relationship between antisocial behavior during adolescence and high school social climate. The data were taken from a longitudinal study of 1233 boys and girls who attended 217 public and private high schools. Subjects’ disruptive behaviors were assessed yearly from 6 to 12 years of age. High schools social climate was assessed by teachers, and students reported on their violent and non violent antisocial behavior while in high school. The multilevel analyses revealed: 1) a large difference between the percentage of variance explained by the school-level variables (3%), compared to the individual-level variables (97%); 2) from the four social climate dimensions assessed, only teachers’ perception of classroom behavior problems explained between-school differences in student reported antisocial behavior 3) students’ family background at the time they entered elementary school, and their developmental trajectories of disruptive behavior during elementary school, predicted antisocial behavior problems during adolescence; 4) the effect of school social climate on adolescent and history behavior remained after controlling for students’ family background and history of behavior problems during elementary school. The theoretical and practical implications of the study are examined and future directions for research are discussed. » (p. 96)

Cet article, soumis pour publication dans Development and Psychopathology, fait partie de la thèse de doctorat de Mme Line LeBlanc, intitulée : Le climat social des écoles secondaires, les problèmes de comportement en classe et les comportements antisociaux.