Intergenerational Reliance on Social Assistance: Evidence from Canada

Intergenerational Reliance on Social Assistance: Evidence from Canada

Intergenerational Reliance on Social Assistance: Evidence from Canada

Intergenerational Reliance on Social Assistance: Evidence from Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [3933]

Beaulieu, Nicolas, Duclos, Jean-Yves, Fortin, Bernard et Rouleau, Manon. 2005. «Intergenerational Reliance on Social Assistance: Evidence from Canada ». Journal of Population Economics, vol. 18, no 3, p. 539-562.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Our paper [estimates] the magnitude and the nature of intergenerational reliance on SA [social assistance] in the province of Québec. An attempt is also made to identify the periods of the pre-adult stage (7–17) during which parental SA participation has the strongest effect on the child’s future SA participation. » (p. 540)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The administrative files of the ministère de la Solidarité sociale provided the basic source of information for our study. We constructed our sample by extracting from those files the records of all children having reached the age of 18 years between 1982 and 1995 (whether or not they themselves were claimants at any time during these years) and whose parents had been on SA for at least one month between 1979 and 1995. This recovered family information on a total of 230,961 children. » (p. 547) « The final sample thus comprised data on 17,203 youths (1990-1995) merged with data on their parents (1979-1995). From this total, 9,613 youths (55.9%) never made any claim between 1990 and 1995, while 7,590 (44.1%) received SA for at least one month. » (p. 548)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This paper provides the first analysis of the intergenerational transmission of participation in a Canadian social assistance program. Two sources of intergenerational transmission are taken into account: one that is due to a possible causal link between parents’ and children’s participation, and one that is due to a correlation between individual and environment specific characteristics across generations. [...] The results reveal that, on average, a one-percentage unit increase in parental participation during the youth’s pre-adult years (age 7-17) raises the youth’s participation rate by 0.29 percentage unit during early adulthood (age 18-21). This impact is stronger during the early stages of childhood (age 7-9) and during late adolescence (age 16-17). » (p. 539)