The Effects of a Parent-Child Paired Reading Program on Reading Abilities, Phonological Awareness and Self-Concept of At-Risk Pupils

The Effects of a Parent-Child Paired Reading Program on Reading Abilities, Phonological Awareness and Self-Concept of At-Risk Pupils

The Effects of a Parent-Child Paired Reading Program on Reading Abilities, Phonological Awareness and Self-Concept of At-Risk Pupils

The Effects of a Parent-Child Paired Reading Program on Reading Abilities, Phonological Awareness and Self-Concept of At-Risk Pupilss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [3882]

Cadieux, Alain et Boudreault, Paul. 2005. «The Effects of a Parent-Child Paired Reading Program on Reading Abilities, Phonological Awareness and Self-Concept of At-Risk Pupils ». Reading Improvement, vol. 42, no 4, p. 224-237.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The hypothesis that we attempted to verify through our research project was whether a parent-child paired reading intervention would increase general academic skills and, more specifically, reading skills. Moreover, we analyzed the effects of paired reading on phonological awareness and self-concept on an exploratory basis. » (p. 227)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The participants were selected among 632 kindergarten pupils attending schools which were part of the same school board in the Outaouais region of the province of Quebec. They were identified in May 2000 using screening tools which were proven by several studies to predict school delays. » (p. 227)

Instruments :
« Tools included the Otis- Lennon School Ability Test [OLSAT], Level 1, as well as a checklist completed by teachers. » (p. 227)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« There is a body of literature suggestion that involving parents in their children’s education is an effective strategy for children at risk of reading failure. In a pre-test/post-test control group design, parents in an experimental group received reading materials and were trained on techniques to stimulate their child during paired reading at home, while a control group only received materials. Reading and general academic abilities were pre- and post-tested, as well as phonological awareness and self-concept. The results show statistically significant gains in general academic abilities and phonological awareness in favor of the experimental group, while no significant gains were noted in reading abilities and self-concept. This report discusses the factors which could explain those results. » (p. 224)