Dawning of Awareness: The Experience of Surrogate Decision Making at the End of Life

Dawning of Awareness: The Experience of Surrogate Decision Making at the End of Life

Dawning of Awareness: The Experience of Surrogate Decision Making at the End of Life

Dawning of Awareness: The Experience of Surrogate Decision Making at the End of Lifes

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Référence bibliographique [3865]

Chambers-Evans, Jane et Carnevale, Franco A. 2005. «Dawning of Awareness: The Experience of Surrogate Decision Making at the End of Life ». Journal of Clinical Ethics, vol. 16, no 1, p. 28-45.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« To further expand knowledge of surrogates who make decisions at the end of life, we undertook a phenomenological study. We sought to further explore the cognitive and emotional processes and the lived experiences of surrogates who must make very difficult decisions to withdraw treatment. An enhanced understanding of these cognitive and emotional processes will help us to tailor and sensitize clinicians’ approaches to end-of-life discussions. We found that a shared decision-making process, while most desirable, requires careful attention to the presentation of information and the support and preservation of the roles and relationships of surrogates. » (p. 31)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« [T]wo broad-fact-finding participants (BFs) [mother/sister and sister] and six primary surrogate decision makers (PSs) [partner, daughter, wife, daughter, daughter and husband]. » (p. 31)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Types de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Participants talked about their role in end-of-life decisions as a process, not as something that happened at a single point in time or as a task. Participants talked about the thinking they had done, the reflexions that had haunted them, their fears about not knowing what was ’the right thing to do’, and their incredible sens of loss. While grief night be described as learning to live with loss, the process taking place in these interviews seemed to be ’pre-grief’: a recognition that loss was coming. The surrogates were struggling to come to terms with the fact that the patient would no longer be part of their lives. » (p. 41)