Growing Up in Three Languages: Triliteracy Practices of Chinese Immigrant Children in Quebec

Growing Up in Three Languages: Triliteracy Practices of Chinese Immigrant Children in Quebec

Growing Up in Three Languages: Triliteracy Practices of Chinese Immigrant Children in Quebec

Growing Up in Three Languages: Triliteracy Practices of Chinese Immigrant Children in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [3838]

Curdt Christiansen, Xiao Lan. 2005. «Growing Up in Three Languages: Triliteracy Practices of Chinese Immigrant Children in Quebec». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal (Québec), Université McGill, Département d’études intégrées en sciences de l’éducation.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« My overall objectives in this study are to explore how Chinese children negociate triliteracy practices in the contexts of a heritage language school and home and to understand to what degree these contexts impact on their identity construction. » (p. 30)

Question :
« How do the complexity of the different contexts and the agents, their goals, and the mediational tool available in these contexts interact with each other in a selected group of Chinese children’s construction of identities and meanings and cultural positionings? » (p. 31)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
- Participant observations in different socio-cultural contexts;
- Interviews;
- Classroom discourses;
- Field-notes;
- Students’ written texts in the three languages.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« In this ethnographic inquiry, I examine how a selected group of Chinese immigrant children in Montreal, Quebec negotiate literacy practices in three languages, Chinese, English and French.[...] I draw on Vygotskian socio-cultural theory as an overarching framework to conceptualize my understanding of Chinese immigrant children’s triliterate actions. I use Wertsch’s concept of ’mediational means’, Bakhtin’s notions of ’utterance, voice, dialogicality’ and Ivanic’s theory of ’writing and identity’ to present portraits that illustrate the complex relationships among the children’s contexts, agency, cultural positionings and uses of literacy as mediational means. I examine the children’s perceptions of their multiple school experiences, their school and language affiliations and identity. Lightfoot’s concept of ’portraiture’ is a useful methodology to illustrate how multilingual children present and negotiate their life worlds in the three languages and spaces—from home to school and from heritage language school to formal public school. The reflective understandings that emerge from this inquiry are integrated within the contexts of the historical role of Confucianism and the characteristics of the written Chinese language. The results of my inquiry suggest that multilingual children’s literate actions are interwoven with issues of agency, access, choice, identity, power and status in different contexts. Results further indicate that maintenance of a heritage language in its written form is possible when children receive appropriate parental support and guidance and have access to literacy materials. The development of multilingual literacies can be strengthened by the collaborative efforts of and dialogs among policy makers, educators, members of cultural communities and immigrant families. » (résumé, p. i)