Examining the Impact of a Social Skills Early Intervention Program for Preschool Aged Children in an Inclusive Setting

Examining the Impact of a Social Skills Early Intervention Program for Preschool Aged Children in an Inclusive Setting

Examining the Impact of a Social Skills Early Intervention Program for Preschool Aged Children in an Inclusive Setting

Examining the Impact of a Social Skills Early Intervention Program for Preschool Aged Children in an Inclusive Settings

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Référence bibliographique [3804]

Dinolfo, Franca. 2005. «Examining the Impact of a Social Skills Early Intervention Program for Preschool Aged Children in an Inclusive Setting». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département des sciences de l’éducation.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an eight (8) week social skills early intervention program for children with developmental disabilities and their typically developing peers. » (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Twenty children attending a preschool setting took part in this study. Participants included 17 typically developing children and three (3) children with special needs. » (p. iii)

Instruments :
- Questionnaires de commentaires et opinions des éducateurs et des parents
- Parent Newsletter

Types de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu et analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Through qualitative analysis using themes this study revealed that the participants showed an awareness of their (1) Attitudes and Feelings, (2) Learning about bullying. They also had an increase in their (3) Focus and Participation and (4) Prosocial Behaviors throughout the program. Based on the findings from the qualitative data and the time sampling (quantitative data), results indicated that instances of prosocial behavior increased from time 1 to time 2. The results from the rating scales and questionnaires completed by the educators of the participating children revealed that the program was developmentally appropriate, that it was something that they would implement in their classrooms and that the children benefited from it. The responses from the parents revealed that the bi-weekly ’Parent Newsletters’ offered useful suggestions and ideas that were well integrated in the home. Also, the program proved beneficial for both the children and their parents in terms of finding ways to discuss critical issues such as emotions, friendships, self-esteem and conflict resolution. Due to the short duration of the program it is unclear if the skills taught were sustained. » (pp. iii-iv)