Access to Post-Secondary Education: An Analytical Framework and New Evidence on Background Effects

Access to Post-Secondary Education: An Analytical Framework and New Evidence on Background Effects

Access to Post-Secondary Education: An Analytical Framework and New Evidence on Background Effects

Access to Post-Secondary Education: An Analytical Framework and New Evidence on Background Effectss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [3766]

Finnie, Ross. 2005. «Access to Post-Secondary Education: An Analytical Framework and New Evidence on Background Effects». Dans Preparing for Post-Secondary Education: New Roles for Governements and Families , sous la dir. de Robert Sweet et Anisef, Paul, p. 17-54. Montréal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper offers [...] a general analytical model, which should be useful for clarifying issues of post-secondary access and capacity. » (p. 19)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« From an analytical standpoint, the problem is that various factors that affect the demand for post-secondary education have been changing while the overall supply of places in the system has been largely stagnant or has in some cases probably decreased as institutions have seen their core funding reduced. How can we disentangle these various influences to better understand what has been happening and, perhaps most importantly, predict what might be expected in the future as the factors affecting demand continue to alter and the supply of places in the system continues to fluctuate as a result of various government policies? From another perspective, how can we better understand what policy should be in terms of access and capacity? » (p. 19)

2. Méthode


Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« The model takes as its starting point a relatively simple supply-demand framework. Its development begins with an outline of the basic features of the demand for post-secondary education - the factors that determine who would like to participate in the system and who is able to do so in the sense of having the required financial resources. A stylised supply side is then described, which essentially reduces to the notion that institutions are willing and able to accept more students if and when they are given the incentives and financial means to do so. With these pieces in place, the general characteristics of the resulting ’equilibrium’ of the system are discussed.
The effects of changes in the various determinants of the system are then analysed. On the demand side, the effect of expanding the student financial assistance system are used as the primary illustrative example, but other factors, including changes in the returns to post-secondary education and family income levels, are also noted. [...]
This is followed by a discussion of the data - some of which are already available, others about to be released - that might allow us to better understand the developments of the post-secondary system in terms of this conceptual framework. [...]
The final part of the paper presents the results of a comparative analysis of patterns of participation in post-secondary education by family type using data from 1991 and from 2000, almost a decade later. The evidence is interesting and important, and fits with one of the principal themes of this book : the role of parents in ensuring that their children have the chance of pursuing post-secondary education, and the corresponding role of government in terms of creating equality of opportunity. The conceptual framework offered here provides a context for placing these discussions in the broader context of the demand for and supply of post-secondary education in Canada. » (pp. 19-20)