Sharing Roles, Sharing Custody? Couples’ Characteristics and Children’s Living Arrangements at Separation

Sharing Roles, Sharing Custody? Couples’ Characteristics and Children’s Living Arrangements at Separation

Sharing Roles, Sharing Custody? Couples’ Characteristics and Children’s Living Arrangements at Separation

Sharing Roles, Sharing Custody? Couples’ Characteristics and Children’s Living Arrangements at Separations

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Référence bibliographique [3687]

Juby, Heather, Le Bourdais, Céline et Marcil-Gratton, Nicole. 2005. «Sharing Roles, Sharing Custody? Couples’ Characteristics and Children’s Living Arrangements at Separation ». Journal of Marriage and Family, vol. 67, no 1, p. 157-172.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In this research, we explore the physical custody arrangements put in place at separation in order to throw some light on both the rising popularity of shared custody and the static (or even declining) incidence of sole father custody during the 1990s. » (p. 158)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« [P]rospective data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N = 758 families) [...]. » (p. 157)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This article examines children’s living arrangements when parents separate, during a period of rapid increase in shared physical custody in the 1990s. [The authors] explore how characteristics of parents in intact families (mother’s employment, income, and so on) influence physical custody outcomes at separation. Findings indicate that although the way couples share roles while living together has a strong influence on how they divide responsibilities when they separate, other factors also have important roles to play. » (p. 157) « Whereas father custody appears to result from widely divergent and often marginal circumstances—probably explaining the absence of any clear evolution over time—the growing popularity of shared living arrangements is largely a response to wider changes in society: the gradual move toward a more equal sharing of family responsibilities between mothers and fathers. » (p. 170)