Familial and Environmental Influences on Longevity in a Pre-Industrial Population

Familial and Environmental Influences on Longevity in a Pre-Industrial Population

Familial and Environmental Influences on Longevity in a Pre-Industrial Population

Familial and Environmental Influences on Longevity in a Pre-Industrial Populations

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Référence bibliographique [3575]

Mazan, Ryan et Gagnon, Alain. 2005. Familial and Environmental Influences on Longevity in a Pre-Industrial Population. London (Ontario): University of Western Ontario.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The purpose of this paper is to examine the socio-demographic, environmental and biological correlates of longevity in families that lived, reproduced, and died prior the great societal transformation brought about by the industrial revolution. » (p. 6)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« We tested, whether, siblings of long-lived individuals experienced a mortality advantage in post-reproductive years, using a series of Cox proportional hazard models. Although the focus was on siblings, we examined the possibility of coincidental associations by including a set of control variables such as parental and spousal ages at death. As mortality varied across time and space, we included additional variables that took into account the secular trends in mortality, urban/rural residence and geographic location. » (p. 7)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« We used data from the Registre de population du Québec ancien, a computerized database made up of biographical files for all individuals of European descent that lived in the Saint-Lawrence valleys in the 17th and 18th Century. » (pp. 6-7)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Data from historical populations provide an adequate context for the examination of the familial and environmental components of longevity. We have investigated the relation between sibling survivorship and longevity through French-Canadian children of a completed fertility cohort born between 1625 and 1704. The Cox regression model was used to analyze the effects of sibling survivorship on the survival time of these early Canadian inhabitants. Other covariates such as regional variation, secular trends (i.e. period effects), parental and spousal survival were also taken into consideration. Our findings show that individuals with at least one sibling surviving beyond 85 years of age had a life-long sustained mortality advantage over the general population. The risks of death after age 50 was 55% and 60% lower for females and males, respectively, having a long-lived sibling. In comparison, the parental of origin effects were negligible. Only the mother-son association in age at death was found significant among the four possible parent-child pairs. Overall, the various models provided better fit to male than to female data. Biological as well as social explanations are explored in order to account for the various results. » (p. 2)